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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 6:03 pm 
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Mil-Surp Collector
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Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 5:00 pm
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Location: huntington beach CA & NE PA
Age: 33
This is where Lee Harvey Oswald under the false name of Alek Hiddel purchased his carcano and 38 special via mail order.

What ever happened to the supplier, Kleins?

Why did he buy via mail order, leaving a paper trail when in Texas at the time he could buy a rifle over the counter with no ID needed?
Or failing that a FTF transaction

seems weird to me


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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 7:20 pm 
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Mil-Surp Psychosis
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Probably because it was cheap. Or he was antisocial, or it was easier to order it than drive to buy one. Any number of reasons.

It got all the law-abiding citizens who'd been buying firearms through the Sears catalog for decades and decades screwed.

As for where the company went. Guns, Chicago? ... C'mon! :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 9:20 pm 
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Mil-Surp Shooter
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Before my time, but maybe one of the old timers will be along shortly, but back in those days, I believe it was very common to buy milsurps mail order. So common, so easy, and so cheap, that I imagine most dealers didn't stock them at all. So if you wanted an old military rifle, mail order was the way to go.

As for why Oswald went that route, I'm guessing he felt it was the most gun for money. He paid $21.45 for it according to this testimony :

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/waldman.htm

And I doubt he could have bought any civilian centerfire rifle for that, even in the early 60's

Rob


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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 9:23 pm 
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Mil-Surp Psychosis
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I remember my dad saying in the 50s he got off the school bus and his rifle was hanging on the mail box! It was rural farm country. I think it was sears.

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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 10:30 pm 
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Mil-Surp Shooter
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I remember in the 60's that Kmart sold milsurps. If I remember right the most expensive one at our local Kmart was a 1903 Springfield. It sold for either $29.95 or $39.95. Everything else was cheaper.


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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2008 2:01 am 
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Benefactor
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I hope that 30 years from now I'm not saying, "I remember when I used to be able to mail-order milsurps and Big5 had them in stock."


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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2008 9:47 am 
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Quote:
I remember in the 60's that Kmart sold milsurps.


Yup!
They were right on on the floor standing up in a barrel like hockey sticks.

I remember Mausers for less then $15. Just pick one up and carry it to the check out.

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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2008 12:07 pm 
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Mil-Surp Shooter
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I was young, but it amazed me back then that you could buy a high powered rifle for about the same price as a BB or pellet gun! Back in the 70's I remember my brother-in law bought a Carcano for $7.00 with two boxes of ammo for deer season. After deer season was over, he sold it because the ammo was hard to find. He basically brought the gun for the ammo and after the ammo was gone, considered the gun not worth keeping, a throw away! I don't have one, but I wish I had it now.


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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2008 12:25 pm 
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Mil-Surp Psychosis
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Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:46 am
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Location: Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
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Up till 1968 there was mil-surps being sold in almost any general/hardware store you walked into. They bought them by weight. K98s were $12.00. Anything in .30-06 was about $10 higher. My dad bought a M1917 in 1949 'cause it was $5 cheaper than the '03. Most working folks only made a $1 a hour back then in my area so a $50-$75 RemChester was out of reach for most of them. He killed a lot of deer with that '17.

Even in the mid 70s there were still alot of 7mm Spanish Mausers available for less than $20 but the more popular mil-surps had been bought up to make fine inidiviual Guns from the actions by then. If you look at what a mid grade bolt action rifle is going for now our mil-surps are still a bargin.

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