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PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2010 9:23 am 
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Mil-Surp Owner
Mil-Surp Owner

Joined: Sun May 30, 2010 9:14 am
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Age: 56
Hi,

Does anyone have a copy of owner's manual/instructions for Redfield International sight?

Thanks, R B Rosier


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 5:11 pm 
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Benefactor
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I don't have one, but what do you want to know?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 11:21 pm 
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Mil-Surp Owner
Mil-Surp Owner

Joined: Sun May 30, 2010 9:14 am
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Age: 56
I'd like to see a labeled diagram to learn the nomenclature and the step by step explanation of how to set up and use the sight. What M.O.A. does each click equal? Come to think of it, I need the same sort of information for the Olympic globe front sight e.g. how to select the appropriate insert. I'm new to using precision aperture sights if you couldn't already tell. Thanks for any help.

R B Rosier


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 11:48 pm 
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Benefactor
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First; almost all the Olympic, and International sights were set up for quarter minute clicks. This factor though is based on a sight separation of 36". If your sights are closer, like 30", your click changes will be more like .300 per click at 100 yds rather than .250. (Inverse correllation)They did make a MK8 sight that had a finer knob rotation of 24 clicks per full revolution.
The graduations on the side will move one line per so many revolutions. (Without looking I can't recall)Each full revolution (12 clicks) moves basically 3 MOA. Thus moving 5 full revolitions (60 clicks) moves 15 MOA. Thats to give you an ability for reading the sight setting plus noting the knob numbers.
The same for the front sight...and I have 5 target rifles with aperature sights, the choice of aperature size will depend on how far away the sight is. As the front sight is moved farther out, you need a larger opening to get the correct picture. Thus a rifle that has a 32" inch sight separation may need a .135 front, while a .115 will do nicely on a rifle with a 25" separation. Your round target (which are usually regulation size targets at the regulation distance)should take almost half the opening. Don't pick a size where you have a skinny white ring. I like the bull to take about 60% of the width up. Below is about a 50% so a slightly smaller aparture should be used to get it closer to 60%


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 11:15 pm 
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Mil-Surp Owner
Mil-Surp Owner

Joined: Sun May 30, 2010 9:14 am
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Age: 56
OK, That all makes sense. So, the elevation scale goes from 0-60 MOA allowing you to hold dead on and compensate for up to 60 inches of bullet drop by adjusting the sight, correct? Now, on the right side of the elevation scale at the top, opposite the MIN marking, is YDS which I assume is an abbreviation for yards, what does that translate to or what is it used for?
Thank you for the diagram of the front sight also, one picture=many words. A follow up question on front sights is when shooting round targets use round inserts, and a post insert for other than round, or is that a personal preference?

Showing much ignorance,

R B Rosier


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 11:49 pm 
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Benefactor
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Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:58 pm
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Each line on the sight is 3 minutes of angle..and yes the sight has markers for 15/30/45 and sometimes 60 (on the better sights). More or less MOA if you had a 36" sight separation. Most competition shooters use the round aperatures, and the post is more or less for informal shooting. It causes eye strain if you are putting many shots down range and trying to keep a thin white line between the post and target.The Yds mark is never used since trajectory can change drastically. Rimfire is one thing, centerfire is alot different. If the sight is kept on one rifle, I guess the sight could be marked, but a written record of the sight setting for the yardage is more or less the proper way. For Rimfire...For your own information and this really depends on how high the sights sit above the bore centerline and using standard velocity ammo; if you are sighted in at 25 yds you would go up about 8 clicks to be on at 50 yds, and another additional 25 clicks to be on at 100. More or less a ballpark setting, you may see some variation due to barrel length, bullet velocity, and height of the sights above boreline center.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2010 11:09 pm 
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Mil-Surp Owner
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Joined: Sun May 30, 2010 9:14 am
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Age: 56
Thanks, You've helped me understand this sight much better. I appreciate it.


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