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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1096 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:36 am

Great western character actors:
Actor and stuntman Terry Wilson was born on September 3, 1923 in Huntington Park, California. A football star during his high school days, Wilson originally planned on becoming a veterinarian and attended California Polytechnic School on a football scholarship. Terry enlisted and served in the Marine Corps from 1943 to 1946. Following his tour of duty, Wilson was chosen by Warner Brothers from amongst a group of athletes to be trained for the stunt profession with his initial specialties being fistfights and work with horses. Among the notable actors that Terry doubled are John Wayne, Ward Bond, and Forrest Tucker. Terry's career as both an actor and stuntman in Westerns spanned several decades. Outside of his work in film and television, Wilson and his fellow stuntman friend Frank McGrath were big hits together on the rodeo circuit (they also appeared at many prison rodeos). Moreover, Terry in the wake of retiring from the film business went on to run a location ranch in Simi Valley, California and was the vice president of a construction firm in Southern California. Wilson died at age 75 on March 30, 1999. He was survived by his wife Mary Ann Wilson and three children.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1097 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 15, 2019 8:03 pm

A pottery jar from a prehistoric pueblo in the southwest.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1098 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 16, 2019 9:44 am

We’ve all seen a million bar fights in western movies. I was thinking about the usual elements. Perhaps you can think of some other examples.

As soon as the first punch is thrown, everyone joins in.

A guy will get a bottle busted over his head. A variation is where they lift up his hat before hitting.

Someone will get lifted up and tosssed over the bar.

Bottles will be thrown at the back bar resulting in lots of broken glass.

Someone will be thrown out the swinging doors and then come charging right back in.

Two guys will be about to swap punches and then realize they are friends.

Someone will be thrown through the front window.

A drunk will take advantage of the confusion to down abandoned drinks.

One or two guys will stand in the corner, watching the fray and occasiuonally ducking a thrown bottle.

A guy will crash through the balcony railing and land on a table, smashing it.

A guy will have a chair smashed over his head.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1099 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 16, 2019 6:44 pm

A camp knife made by Burt Foster.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1100 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 17, 2019 10:51 am

The Natural Bridge Caverns are the largest known commercial caverns in the U.S. state of Texas. The name is derived from the 60 ft natural limestone slab bridge that spans the amphitheater setting of the cavern's entrance. The span was left suspended when a sinkhole collapsed below it.

The caverns are located near the city of San Antonio, Texas in the Texas Hill Country next to the Natural Bridge Wildlife Ranch, a drive-through wildlife safari park. The caverns feature several unique speleothems and other geological formations. The temperature inside the cave is 21 degrees Celsius year-round and the humidity rate is a constant 99 percent. The deepest part of the public tour is 180 feet below the surface, although undeveloped areas of the cavern reach depths of 230 feet.

The caverns are still slowly developing. Due to the porosity of the limestone, rainwater travels downwards through the layers of rock, where it dissolves out calcite, a weak mineral that makes up all of the speleothems at Natural Bridge Caverns. After exiting the limestone, water enters the caverns where it flows and drips constantly throughout causing the formations to retain a luster that can not be seen in dry caverns.

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The caverns were discovered on March 27, 1960, by students Orion Knox Jr., Preston Knodell Jr., Al Brandt and Joe Cantu from St. Mary's University in nearby San Antonio. On their fourth trip into the caverns, the men discovered/explored just over a mile of passage. Subsequent explorations revealed 2 miles associated with what became known as the "North Cavern."
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1101 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 17, 2019 5:11 pm

Here are a couple more pairs by Crockett.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1102 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 18, 2019 9:27 am

From the "what will they think of next" department: a knife made from a pipe wrench.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1103 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 18, 2019 5:21 pm

Great western character actors: Jack Lambert
American character actor specializing in tough guys and heavies. A native of Yonkers, New York. He worked on the Broadway stage and then became an increasingly familiar figure in Westerns and crime dramas, after World War II. Although almost as familiar a presence in films as his contemporaries Warren Oates, Robert J. Wilke, and Leo Gordon, for some reason Lambert never became as well-known. Despite having appeared in a great number of similar roles and films. His credits are often confused with those of the Scottish actor.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1104 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 19, 2019 12:18 am

The original Western Pacific Railroad was established in 1865 to build the westernmost portion of the Transcontinental Railroad between San Jose, California (later Oakland, California), and Sacramento, California. This company was absorbed into the Central Pacific Railroad in 1870.

The second company to use the name Western Pacific Railroad was founded in 1903. Under the direction of George Jay Gould I, the Western Pacific was founded to provide a standard gauge track connection to the Pacific Coast for his aspiring Gould transcontinental system. The construction was financed by the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad, a company in the Gould system, which lost access to California due to the attempted acquisition of the Southern Pacific Railroad by the Rio Grande's main rival, the Union Pacific Railroad. The Western Pacific Railroad acquired the Alameda and San Joaquin Railroad and began construction on what would become the Feather River Route. In 1909 it became the last major railroad completed into California. It used 85-lb rail on untreated ties, with no tie plates except on curves over one degree; in 1935 more than half of the main line still had its original rail, most of it having carried 150 million gross tons.

In 1931 Western Pacific opened a main line north from the Feather River Canyon to the Great Northern Railway in northern California. This route, the "Highline", joined the Oakland – Salt Lake City main line at the Keddie Wye, a unique combination of two steel trestles and a tunnel forming a triangle of intersecting track. In 1935, the railroad went bankrupt because of decreased freight and passenger traffic caused by the Depression and had to be reorganized.

WP attracted rail enthusiasts from around the world. It operated the California Zephyr passenger train with the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. The WP handled the "Silver Lady" from Oakland, California, to Salt Lake City, Utah from 1949–1970. The Western Pacific owned several connecting short-line railroads. The largest was the Sacramento Northern Railway, which once reached from San Francisco to Chico, California. Others included the Tidewater Southern Railway, the Central California Traction, the Indian Valley Railroad and the Deep Creek Railroad. At the end of 1970 WP operated 1,187 miles of road and 1,980 miles (3,190 km) of track, not including its Sacramento Northern and Tidewater Southern subsidiaries.

In 1983, the Union Pacific Corporation purchased the Western Pacific and the WP became part of a combined Union Pacific rail system: the Union Pacific Railroad, the Missouri Pacific Railroad, and the WP. The Western Pacific and the Missouri Pacific was merged into the Union Pacific Railroad by the Union Pacific Corporation. In 1996, Union Pacific purchased the WP's long-time rival, the Southern Pacific Transportation Company. In July 2005 Union Pacific unveiled a brand new EMD SD70ACe locomotive, Union Pacific 1983, painted as an homage to the Western Pacific.



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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1105 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:25 pm

A pair of Buermann pairs.
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