Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs

Post by nrobertb »

A pair of North & Judd iron spurs, probably from the cheap end of the catalog.
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ffuries
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Re: Spurs

Post by ffuries »

nrobertb wrote:
Wed Apr 25, 2018 10:25 am
Here's a very strange old bit. Maybe the bit is porous and the funnel feeds some sort of medicine or lubrication.
Drenching Bit for medicating horses. Just for the record I didn't know that, I was curious as to what it was and how it was used, so I just googled horse bit with funnel and it was the first hit.

https://www.farmshow.com/a_article.php?aid=11393
Last edited by ffuries on Wed Apr 25, 2018 11:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Spurs

Post by 72 usmc »

Here is a link to one of many Fort union archaeology CRM reports. The Fort Union trading post is in ND and dates to 1828-1867 and its reports deal with more information on material culture. On the bottles and buttons, metal as well a personal items and general hardware. A great reference on early post 1820-1870 artifacts.

These are the Sante Fe trail Fort union-a later date
https://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online_ ... eology.pdf
https://repository.upenn.edu/cgi/viewco ... =hp_theses

https://www.nps.gov/foun/learn/historyc ... TOME-2.pdf
http://www.santafetrailresearch.com/for ... .html#fuc3

This one The Sante Fe Trail Ft. Union dates to 1851-1891. I was never on this site. http://www.kansasheritage.org/research/sft/ft-union.htm

I eliminated the MT ND Fort Union trading post links/reports :oops: :oops: :oops:
Since Spurs added some info: here is a list of those reports if anyone is interested but they are not the NM site.
https://www.nps.gov/mwac/fous/accomplishments.htm
see botton of this post for active links to NPS reports


Off topic, for those that like western material culture : the Fort Bowie in AZ report by Herskovitz is one of the greats, more Military than Cowboy related, but like the Trading Post -Fort Union ND reports, this one is in Az and deals with Indian Army life 1867-1894 on the Apache Pass. Nice for artifact ID. There are many Army Fort arch. reports. Most considered grey lit. that are hard to find or have restricted distribution due to so many metal detector looters at these historic sites.

Look up "PDF Fort Bowie Material Culture" This one; click on it and it opens to the report no need to get the book.
PDF Fort Bowie Material Culture
arizona.openrepository.com/arizona/bitstream/10150/.../1/978-0-8165-0563-0-web.pdf
by RM Herskovitz - ‎1978 - ‎Cited by 30 - ‎Related articles
All Rights Reserved. Manufactured in the U.S.A.. I.S.B.N. 0-8165-0563-2. L.C. No. 78-6607. Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data. Herskovitz, Robert M. Fort Bowie material culture. (Anthropological papers of the University of. Arizona; no. 31). Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Fort Bowie National Historic Site.
FOR DIRECT LINKS TO THE MANY NPS ARCHAEOLOGICAL REPORTS AT SIGNIFICANT National register sites see this link that will take you to PDF versions- search by site or park name. A huge list of NPS publications on line

http://npshistory.com/park_histories.htm
Last edited by 72 usmc on Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:17 am, edited 17 times in total.
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Re: Spurs

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Another British bit: 16th Lancers. The 16th The Queen's Lancers was a cavalry regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1759. It saw service for two centuries, before being amalgamated with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers to form the 16th/5th Lancers) in 1922.
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Re: Spurs

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Just thought I'd mention that some of the archeological reports mentioned above are for Ft. Union Trading Post in North Dakota, which is a different site from Ft. Union in New Mexico, as 72 usmc pointed out..

Here is a collection of snaffle bits and a few stirrups:
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Re: Spurs

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Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site is the site of a partially reconstructed trading post on the Missouri River and the North Dakota/Montana border. It is one of the earliest declared National Historic Landmarks in the United States. The fort, possibly first known as Fort Henry or Fort Floyd, was built in 1828 or 1829 by the Upper Missouri Outfit managed by Kenneth McKenzie and capitalized by John Jacob Astor's American Fur Company.

Fort Union was the most important fur trading post on the upper Missouri until 1867. It was instrumental in developing the fur trade in Montana. Here Assiniboine, Crow, Cree, Ojibwe, Blackfoot, Hidatsa, Lakota, and other tribes traded buffalo robes and furs for trade goods. Historic visitors to the fort included John James Audubon, George Catlin, Father Pierre DeSmet, Sitting Bull, Hugh Glass, and Jim Bridger.

Hugh Glass was the basis for the 2015 movie The Revenant.
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Re: Spurs

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We've seen some gal leg spurs. Here are two brass bits and one is the gal leg style.
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Re: Spurs

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Another western fort:
Fort Clatsop was the encampment of the Lewis and Clark Expedition in the Oregon Country near the mouth of the Columbia River during the winter of 1805-1806. The fort was the last encampment of the Corps of Discovery, before embarking on their return trip east to St. Louis.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition wintered at Fort Clatsop before returning east to St. Louis in the spring of 1806. It took just over 3 weeks for the Expedition to build the fort, and it served as their camp from December 8, 1805 until their departure on March 23, 1806

The fort is part of the Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks.
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Re: Spurs

Post by ffuries »

nrobertb wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:57 pm
Another western fort:
Fort Clatsop was the encampment of the Lewis and Clark Expedition in the Oregon Country near the mouth of the Columbia River during the winter of 1805-1806. The fort was the last encampment of the Corps of Discovery, before embarking on their return trip east to St. Louis.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition wintered at Fort Clatsop before returning east to St. Louis in the spring of 1806. It took just over 3 weeks for the Expedition to build the fort, and it served as their camp from December 8, 1805 until their departure on March 23, 1806

The fort is part of the Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks.
Amazing how quick they could build things like this with rudimentary tools and yet last forever. Buildings today take months to erect and you'd be lucky if it will be standing in 30 years. A true testament to old school craftsmanship.
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Re: Spurs

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Continuing with Lewis & Clark: Pompeys Pillar National Monument is a rock formation located in south central Montana, United States. Exhibits in the 5,700-square foot center relate the journey of Captain William Clark and his detachment, including Sacagawea and her son Pomp, down the Yellowstone River Valley in 1806.

The pillar itself stands 150 feet (45 m) above the Yellowstone River and consists of sandstone from the late Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation, 75 – 66 million years ago.

The pillar features an abundance of Native American petroglyphs, as well as the signature of William Clark, co-leader of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Clark's inscription is the only remaining physical evidence found along the route that was followed by the expedition.

The inscription consists of his signature and the date, July 25, 1806. Clark wrote that he climbed the sandstone pillar and "had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river". He named the outcropping after Jean Baptiste Charbonneau—the son of expedition member Sacagawea—whom he nicknamed "Pompy".
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Re: Spurs

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Lewis & Clark's air rifle was discussed on the old forum and I thought it worth bringing back.

The Girandoni air rifle was an airgun designed by Tyrolian inventor Bartholomäus Girandoni circa 1779. The weapon was also known as the Windbüchse ("wind rifle" in German). One of the rifle's more famous associations is its use on the Lewis and Clark Expedition to explore and map the western part of North America in the early 1800s.

The Girandoni air rifle was in service with the Austrian army from 1780 to around 1815. Many references to the Girandoni air rifles mention lethal combat ranges of 125 to 150 yards and some extend that range considerably. The advantages of a high rate of fire, no smoke from propellants, and low muzzle report granted it acceptance. It did have problems and was eventually removed from service for several reasons decades after introduction. While the detachable air reservoir was capable of around 30 shots it took nearly 1,500 strokes of a hand pump to fill those reservoirs. The reservoirs, made from hammered sheet iron held together with rivets and sealed by brazing, proved very difficult to manufacture using the techniques of the period and were always in short supply. In addition, the weapon was very delicate and a small break in the reservoir could make it inoperable.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition used the rifle in the demonstrations they performed to awe nearly every Native American tribe they encountered.
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Re: Spurs

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Here's an interesting geological feature in Yellowstone, on the Norris to Mammoth road.

Obsidian Cliff was an important source of volcanic glass for prehistoric peoples. Obsidian from this site was first quarried here about 12,000 years ago. Early natives of North America placed a high value on the obsidian that came from this cliff as well as other similar obsidian deposits in the area because numerous tools could be fashioned: knives, spear/arrow tips, and other sharp edged objects. In fact, obsidian from Obsidian Cliff was so sought after in early America that it was traded as far away as Ohio and Canada.

The point in the photo came from this cliff and is thought to be at least 10,000 years old.
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Re: Spurs

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nrobertb wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:21 pm
Here's an interesting geological feature in Yellowstone, on the Norris to Mammoth road.

Obsidian Cliff was an important source of volcanic glass for prehistoric peoples. Obsidian from this site was first quarried here about 12,000 years ago. Early natives of North America placed a high value on the obsidian that came from this cliff as well as other similar obsidian deposits in the area because numerous tools could be fashioned: knives, spear/arrow tips, and other sharp edged objects. In fact, obsidian from Obsidian Cliff was so sought after in early America that it was traded as far away as Ohio and Canada.

The point in the photo came from this cliff and is thought to be at least 10,000 years old.
Wow that is cool, it's like tracing a modern weapon to a specific arsenal.
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Re: Spurs

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Rattlesnakes were an ever present threat to folks in the old west, and still are today for that matter. If you’ve read James Michener’s book Centennial, you may remember the young girl traveling in a wagon train who died of snakebite.

The best resource to learn about rattlers is the two-volume book entitled Rattlesnakes: Their Habits, Life Histories and Influence on Mankind, published in 1956. It is still considered to be the most complete and authoritative resource ever written on rattlesnakes. The author is Laurence Klauber, former curator of reptiles at the San Diego Natural History Museum.

In one volume he interviews hundreds of old timers: ranchers, miners, trappers and others whose lives brought them in contact with snakes. In the other volume he describes in detail the hundreds of species of rattlers in North, Central and South America. If you can find a copy, it is fascinating reading.

The photo is of a western diamondback (sometimes called a blacktail), a large and aggressive rattler.
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Re: Spurs

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By the way, there are several videos on youtube about the Lewis and Clark air rifle, including one firing a replica.

Here is a fancy parade bridle.
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