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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1291 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 08, 2019 10:10 am

The Dirty Devil River is an 80-mile-long tributary of the Colorado River, located in the state of Utah. It flows through southern Utah from the confluence of the Fremont River and Muddy Creek before emptying into the Colorado River at Lake Powell.

The Dirty Devil River is formed in Wayne County near Hanksville at the confluence of the Fremont River and Muddy Creek. It flows generally southward through a 2,000-foot-deep canyon in Wayne and Garfield counties. Its lower 20 miles flows through Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, where it finally disembogues into the Colorado River at a point that is now submerged beneath Lake Powell.

The canyon carved by the river is particularly isolated and seldom visited compared to other natural areas in the region. The average discharge is approximately 446 cubic feet per second.

The Dirty Devil River was named by the 1869 Powell Geographic Expedition led by John Wesley Powell, which explored much of the Colorado River and its tributaries. It was named for the extreme salinity and turbidity of the water near its mouth. Powell later contrasted it with a much cleaner stream in the Grand Canyon, which he named Bright Angel Creek.

The outlaw Butch Cassidy and his gang used tributary canyons of the Dirty Devil, such as Robbers Roost, as a hideout in the 1890s.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1292 Post by nrobertb » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:14 am

The Robbers Roost was an outlaw hideout in southeastern Utah used mostly by Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch gang in the closing years of the Old West.

The hideout was considered ideal because of the rough terrain. It was easily defended, difficult to navigate into without detection, and excellent when the gang needed a month or longer to rest and lie low following a robbery. It was while hiding out at Robbers Roost that Elzy Lay and Butch Cassidy first formed the Wild Bunch gang. The Wild Bunch gang, early on led by Cassidy and his closest friend Elzy Lay, developed contacts inside Utah that gave them easy access to supplies of fresh horses and beef, most notably the ranch owned by outlaw sisters Ann Bassett and Josie Bassett. The gang constructed cabins inside Robbers Roost to help shield them from the harsh winters. There, they stored weapons, horses, chickens, and cattle.

Pursuing lawmen of the day never discovered the site of the hideout. The outlaws held each other to strict confidentiality regarding its location. There were only five women known to have ever been allowed inside Robbers Roost: Ann and Josie Bassett, the Sundance Kid's girlfriend Etta Place, one of Elzy Lay's girlfriends Maude Davis, and gang member Laura Bullion.

Charlie Siringo wrote that Robbers' Roost was "fifty miles east of Hanksville, where the 'Wild Bunch' used twenty dollar gold pieces for poker chips." He goes on to write the Wild Bunch used Robbers' Roost as "headquarters for several years until Joe Bush and a posse of Salt Lake City officers made a raid on the 'Roost' and killed some of the gang."

Robbers Roost Canyon, a remote tributary of the Dirty Devil River, is named after this hideout.

Today, Robbers Roost attracts hikers, backpackers, horseback riders, and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) enthusiasts. Many steep, narrow slot canyons popular with technical canyoneers are found in Robbers Roost.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1293 Post by nrobertb » Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:36 am

The Sangre de Cristo Mountains (Spanish for "Blood of Christ") are the southernmost subrange of the Rocky Mountains. They are located in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico in the United States. The mountains run from Poncha Pass in South-Central Colorado, trending southeast and south, ending at Glorieta Pass, southeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The mountains contain a number of fourteen thousand foot peaks in the Colorado portion, as well as all the peaks in New Mexico which are over thirteen thousand feet.

The name of the mountains may refer to the occasional reddish hues observed during sunrise and sunset, and when alpenglow occurs, especially when the mountains are covered with snow. Although the particular origin of the name is unclear, it has been in use since the early 19th century. Before that time the terms "La Sierra Nevada", "La Sierra Madre", "La Sierra", and "The Snowies" (used by English speakers) were used. According to tradition, "sangre de Cristo" were the last words of a priest who was killed by Native Americans.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1294 Post by nrobertb » Fri Oct 11, 2019 10:25 am

When you were a kid and passed a truckload of hay on the road, did you ever say this poem?
Load of hay
load of hay.
Make a wish
and carry it away
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1295 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:18 pm

Great western character actors: Celia Lovsky (born Cäcilia Josefina Lvovsky, February 21, 1897 – October 12, 1979) was an Austrian-American actress. She was born in Vienna, She studied theater, dance, and languages at the Austrian Royal Academy of Arts and Music. She is best known to fans of Star Trek as the original T'Pau, and to fans of The Twilight Zone as the aged mother of an eternally youthful Hollywood actress.

She started taking roles in American movies and television. She made a name for herself playing slightly exotic roles such as the deaf-mute mother of Lon Chaney in Man of a Thousand Faces (1957) with James Cagney and Apache Princess Saba in the 1955 film Foxfire starring Jane Russell and Jeff Chandler.

As she grew older, she was given dignified dowager roles, such as a Spanish matriarch in an episode of Bonanza titled "The Spanish Grant" (1960), Romany matriarchs, elderly Native American women such as in the Wagon Train episode "A Man Called Horse", expatriate Russian princesses, and a brief but memorable role as the widowed mother of Reinhard Schwimmer, one of the victims in the film The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967). Her final movie appearance was of the "Exchange Leader" in Soylent Green (1973). She delivers the final confirmation to Edward G. Robinson's character Sol about Soylent Green's true ingredient.

She is particularly well-known for two of her television appearances: the Twilight Zone episode "Queen of the Nile" (1964), in which she played the elderly daughter of a never-aging actress (played by Ann Blyth); and she was the original T'Pau, the Vulcan diplomat, judge, and philosopher who presides at Mister Spock's wedding in the Star Trek episode "Amok Time" (1967).
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1296 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 12, 2019 9:23 pm

You've seen David Baker on Forged With Fire. Here's one of his knives. Fishhook Damascus, bronze habaki, horn spacer, maple handle, carbon fiber pin.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1297 Post by nrobertb » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:38 pm

A Olsen Nolte Saddle Shop parade saddle from San Carlos, CA.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1298 Post by nrobertb » Mon Oct 14, 2019 9:24 am

The Skunk River is a 93-mile-long tributary of the Mississippi River in the state of Iowa in the United States.
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The Skunk River rises in two branches, the South Skunk (185 miles long) and the North Skunk (129 miles long). The headwaters of the South Skunk are in Hamilton County in north central Iowa. It flows roughly due southward, to the west of Interstate 35, and passes through the city of Ames, before turning southeasterly. In Keokuk County, it is joined by the North Skunk, which has its headwaters in Marshall County. It then proceeds southeastward and flows into the Mississippi about five miles south of the city of Burlington.

The Sauk and Meskwaki referred to the Skunk River as "Shecaqua". This name was probably mistranslated; one early settler wrote, "I was informed by Frank Labisner, United States interpreter for the Sac and Fox Indians, that the name of Skunk River was a wrong interpretation. The Indian name was Checaqua. Which, in their language is anything of a strong or obnoxious smell, such as onions. I think, that from the fact that the head waters of the stream abounded with wild onions, the interpretation should be 'Onion.'"

Species of fish found in the Skunk River include smallmouth bass, gar, walleye, catfish, carp, bluegill, sheephead, bullhead, and largemouth bass.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1299 Post by nrobertb » Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:30 pm

Blue Noldorin Dagger; Damascus Steel, Bone, and Rosewood Burl
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1300 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 15, 2019 5:58 pm

The Raccoon River is a 30.8-mile-long tributary of the Des Moines River in central Iowa in the United States. As measured using the longest of its three forks, its length increases to 226 miles . Via the Des Moines River, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. The river runs through an intensely cultivated area of croplands and livestock farming, receiving Tile drainage from slow-draining rich natural bottomland.

The Des Moines metropolitan area has been obtaining its drinking water from the Raccoon River just before it empties into the Des Moines River through water utilities since the 19th century. During the Great Flood of 1993, the Raccoon River flooded the water treatment facility of Des Moines, shutting off the city's supply of drinking water.

Excerpt of the Racoon River on the Map of Lewis and Clark's Track, Across the Western Portion of North America, 1814
The Racoon River was first documented on the 1814 map by Lewis and Clark, though the USGS references the name to a later map from 1843 named Hydrological Basin of the Upper Mississippi River based on field measurements by Joseph N. Nicollet during his Midwestern expeditions in the 1830´s.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1301 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:22 pm

Great western character actors: Patrick McVey (March 17, 1910 – July 6, 1973) was an American actor who starred in three television series between 1950 and 1961, Big Town, Boots and Saddles, and Manhunt.

McVey was born in Fort Wayne in Allen County in northeastern Indiana. His education included undergraduate and law degrees from Indiana University. He was an attorney before he became interested in acting. His early acting experience came in little theater productions, and then he honed his skills at Pasadena Community Playhouse.

McVey had experience on stage prior to his film debut in 1941, when he made uncredited appearances in eight films, beginning with Caught in the Draft. More than a dozen uncredited film roles followed in 1942. In 1946, he appeared in director Jean Yarbrough's thriller, The Brute Man. McVey seldom rose above supporting player roles in films but had more success on television.

His Broadway credits include Camino Real (1969), The Time of Your Life (1969), and Hold It! (1947).

A life member of The Actors Studio, McVey made his small screen debut on September 5, 1950, in the early CBS series Suspense. On the following week's episode, he had his first starring role, and less than a month later, McVey began a four-year role (160 episodes) as Steve Wilson, the crusading managing editor of the fictitious Illustrated Press, in Big Town, a melodrama set in a newspaper office in a large American city. He left the series in 1954. That same year, McVey appeared in two episodes of NBC's Kraft Television Theater. Thereafter, McVey guest starred on The Gale Storm Show, The Millionaire, Playhouse 90, Hazel, Bourbon Street Beat, and in four Westerns: The Restless Gun, Man Without a Gun, Sugarfoot, and Bat Masterson. In 1957 McVey appeared as Sheriff Dave Beaton on the TV western Cheyenne in the episode titled "Decision at Gunsight." In 1958 he appeared as Sheriff Kim Younger on Cheyenne in the episode titled "Ghost of the Cimarron."

From 1957 to 1958, McVey co-starred in the syndicated series Boots and Saddles as Lieutenant Colonel Wesley Hayes. After the series ended in 1958, McVey was cast as police reporter Ben Andrews in another syndicated series, Manhunt. Manhunt was canceled in 1961, and McVey continued his career with guest roles on various television series including General Electric Theater, Cheyenne, Tombstone Territory, The Rifleman, Have Gun – Will Travel, The Virginian, Gunsmoke and three appearances on Perry Mason, including the role of District Attorney Covington in the 1959 episode, "The Case of the Dubious Bridegroom."

McVey's last television roles were in the CBS drama The Nurses, and as the character John Harris in the ABC soap opera Dark Shadows (1966). In 1968, he was cast in Frank Sinatra's The Detective. McVey made his last on-screen appearance in the 1973 film Bang the Drum Slowly.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1302 Post by nrobertb » Wed Oct 16, 2019 1:34 pm

The Waterpocket Fold is a geologic landform that extends from southern Wayne through Garfield and ending in northern Kane counties of southern Utah. The geologic structure is a south-southeast trending fold in which the east side is dropped relative to the west side. This monoclinal fold extends for nearly 100 miles in the semi-arid plateau of the central part of the state. The structure defines the Capitol Reef National Park in southern Utah.

The feature can be observed in three scenic routes in the park. One route leads to a famous landmark known as the Golden Throne. The northern portion of the Waterpocket Fold lies north and east of the town of Fruita, three miles west and just southeast of the Middle Desert. Utah State Route 24 crosses the fold east of Fruita and Notom Road runs south through Notom and runs parallel to the east (downdropped) side of the structure to its intersection with Utah State Route 276 just north of Lake Powell. The southern end of the structure extends to the Colorado River just southwest of Halls Crossing.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1303 Post by nrobertb » Thu Oct 17, 2019 9:52 am

Fort Reno (Oklahoma) began as a temporary camp in July 1874 near the Darlington Agency, which needed protection from an Indian uprising that eventually led to the Red River War. After the conflict ended, the post remained to control and protect the Southern Cheyenne and Southern Arapaho reservation, and Fort Reno was established as a permanent fort on July 15, 1874. Soldiers from Fort Reno also attempted to control Boomer and Sooner activity during the rush to open the Unassigned Lands for settlement. Among the units stationed here were the famed Ninth Cavalry of Buffalo Soldiers. The fort lent its name to the city of El Reno, which still exists, as well as Reno City, which was abandoned before Oklahoma statehood.

After Oklahoma statehood in 1907, the post was abandoned on February 24, 1908, but remained as a quartermaster remount depot. During World War II, German and Italian prisoners of war were housed on the grounds; the fort's chapel was built by members of the Afrika Korps. In 1949, the fort was abandoned by the Army and transferred to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which uses it as its Grazinglands Research Laboratory. The laboratory's mission is to develop and deliver improved technologies, management strategies, and strategic and tactical planning tools which help evaluate and manage economic and environmental risks, opportunities, and tradeoffs, for integrated crop, forage, and livestock systems under variable climate, energy and market conditions.

The remains of German and Italian prisoners of war, residents of the fort, pioneer settlers, and military personnel are interred in the fort's cemetery. Ben Clark, a frontier scout for George Armstrong Custer and Philip Sheridan, is buried there. The fort is open to the public and has a visitor's center with fort memorabilia and exhibits. Fort Reno was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1304 Post by nrobertb » Thu Oct 17, 2019 10:39 pm

Nathan Boone (1780–1857) was a veteran of the War of 1812, a delegate to the Missouri constitutional convention in 1820, and a captain in the 1st United States Regiment of Dragoons at the time of its founding, eventually rising to the rank of lieutenant colonel. Nathan was the youngest son of Daniel Boone.

Nathan Boone was born at Boone Station, near Athens, Fayette County, Kentucky in 1780 and moved to Spanish Missouri with the family in 1799. In 1807, he and his brother Daniel first worked the Salt licks in what became known as the Booneslick Country. The brothers built the Boone's Lick Road, which became a major overland route in early Missouri.

Boone took part in the War of 1812 as captain of a company of United States Rangers which scouted in the country between the Mississippi and Illinois. He also took part in an expedition led by Henry Dodge to relieve settlers who had been raided by Miami Indians. He and Dodge saved 150 Miamis from massacre by members of their own militia. The Miamis had agreed to surrender as prisoners of war, and certain members of the militia became angered when they found contraband belonging to a settler who had been killed in the original raid, but Dodge and Boone literally stood in the line of fire and forced the nearly mutinous troops to back down. He attained the rank of major in the militia in this war.

After he was mustered out Boone retired to his farm in St. Charles County, Missouri. He built the first stone house north of the Missouri and his father died there. In 1820 he was a delegate to the Missouri constitutional convention

He participated in the Black Hawk War in 1832. After the conclusion of those hostilities, he entered the regular army as captain in the United States Regiment of Dragoons, direct predecessor of the 1st Cavalry Regiment (United States Army), the regiment's first commander being Colonel Dodge. He participated in the First Dragoon Expedition, notable for making the first contact between the United States federal government and the southern plains Indians. His army service further included participation in the Second Dragoon Expedition, surveying the boundaries between the Creek and Cherokee Indian nations, and leading his own expedition into the southwestern plains in 1843. In 1847, he was made major in the army, and lieutenant-colonel in 1853. In 1853, Nathan Boone resigned and retired to his home in Missouri, Greene County, Missouri, where he died in 1857.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1305 Post by nrobertb » Fri Oct 18, 2019 7:51 pm

Two pairs of spurs. The top one is by Nels and Tom Qualey. The other is by North & Judd.
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