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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1066 Post by nrobertb » Fri Mar 29, 2019 9:52 am

Black Chasm Cavern is a solution cave, formed by sulfuric acid reacting with down-moving oxygenated surface water. This erodes the limestone bedrock to form small to very large chambers. Many lakes make up the lower levels of the cavern. There are a variety of formations in Black Chasm Cavern, including stalactites, stalagmites, columns, flowstone, draperies, ribbons, angel's wings, cave bacon, soda straws, helictites, false floors, and others.

Black Chasm was likely known about by the local MiWok tribes, though gold miners were the first credited with exploring the cave in 1854. Somewhere near the 1860s, the cave entrance was enlarged from its original 18" wide crack in order to accommodate stairs for tours. The tours lasted only a short time before the cave was abandoned.

Following the gold rush, Black Chasm's name faded from memory, only to be rediscovered with a resurgence in caving interest in the 1950s. In 1962, a diver entered into Lake Reflection, one of the many lakes in the cave, and descended to 65' before hitting bottom. This dive took place in summertime when the fluctuating lake level is at its lowest.

Black Chasm Cavern has passed through various owners, including Owens Illinois Cement Co., American Cement Co., and, currently, Sierra Nevada Recreation Corporation (SNRC). Black Chasm was selected for consideration as a National Natural Landmark (NNL) in 1975 after National Park Service personnel entered into the cave and saw the helictite crystal display in the Landmark Room. The park service personnel described Black Chasm as having, "The best helictites in the west." At the time, Black Chasm was slated to be quarried, as an open pit mine, for the gravel that the bedrock would provide. The quarry company who owned the land was aware of the cave, but not of its rare display of helictites. After the NNL status was granted in January 1976, the quarry company still had legal rights to quarry the property, but there was a moral obligation placed on the landowners to preserve the cave in order to retain its NNL status. The quarry company chose to honor the NNL status, separating the cavern property from the remainder of the quarry, which is still in production today.

In 1999, development began on the property, which included creating a road, septic and utility installation, and building storage facilities. Stair building into the cavern began in July 2000, with the first walking tours being offered on the last weekend in September 2000. The trail-building spanned just over 10 months, as the crew frequently harnessed up and used ropes for the construction process. Though introductory tours were being conducted during the stair construction period, the grand opening of Black Chasm took place in April 2001. Future plans to extend the trail will allow guests to visit twice as many chambers as are currently seen on the walking tour.

Early tour guests purchased their tickets at a kiosk, but in December 2003 a 3,000 square feet (280 m2). visitor center was opened to the public. In the same year, an updated survey and exploration took place in the cave and in one of the lakes. Using traditional tape measures and compass readings, as well as using a laser measuring device, the exploration team surveyed the original half mile of cave and also discovered an additional half mile, doubling the length of known cave. Total surveyed length of Black Chasm is 3,136 feet, and the overall depth, including the lake, is 225 feet, with 146 feet above lake level.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1067 Post by nrobertb » Fri Mar 29, 2019 9:07 pm

Colorado Bend State Park is a 5,328.3-acre Texas state park in the Hill Country region. It was purchased in 1984 and opened to public in 1987. It is representative of the karst features typically seen in the Hill Country, with many sinkholes, caves, and springs.

The Spicewood Springs trail is one of the hiking trails in the park with numerous creek crossings. The trail is 2.5-mile one way, but hikers can take a slightly different hike back. It has numerous spring-fed swimming holes found along the trail.

The Gorman Creek trail is divided into a blue-marker loop and a yellow-marker loop, with dry chaparral terrain. The highlights of the park trails are a travertine creek on the east, and a large waterfall with caves on the west. A protected portion of the park is open by guided tour only. The Gorman Spring and a couple of other springs feed Gorman Creek, which then descends a spectacular 65 feet forming what is known as Gorman Falls. The tour is a 1.5-mile round trip trail leading to the spectacular waterfall, which is formed by fern covered Travertine. The self-guided Gorman Spring trail and the trail to the waterfall is now open to the public during regular park hours. There are also many wild cave tour opportunities, ranging in difficulties from walking to crawling.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1068 Post by nrobertb » Sat Mar 30, 2019 9:33 am

More spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1069 Post by nrobertb » Sat Mar 30, 2019 12:33 pm

Utilitarian actor Lonny Chapman remains one of those highly familiar character faces to which you can't quite place the name. While he appeared in over 30 films and well over 300 TV programs over a five-decade career, the theater remained his first and foremost passion and for which he is best remembered.

He was born Lon Leonard Chapman on October 1, 1920, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, but grew up in the city of Joplin, Missouri. His interest in acting started while fairly young. Following his graduations from Joplin High School (1938) and Joplin Junior College (1940), the athletically-inclined Lonny attended the University of Oklahoma on a track scholarship. The bombing of Pearl Harbor, however, interrupted his college studies, joining the Marines the very next day. He saw major action in the South Pacific, including Guadalcanal. During his 5-year tour of duty, he contracted malaria; frequent recurrences would plague him the rest of his life. The track star returned to his Oklahoma college following war duty and graduated with a BFA in Drama in 1947.

While at college Lonny became best friends with actor Dennis Weaver, who was also a talented track-and-field athlete and fellow drama student. The two young hopefuls hitchhiked together to New York City where they began their respective careers.

Quite visible on TV, he appeared to good advantage in prime-time programming. Headlining one TV series that never got firmly off the ground, The Investigator (1958), in which he played a private detective, he also co-starred with William Shatner and Jessica Walter in the "Law and Order" precursor For the People (1965). During the 60s, 70s and 80s, the gruff, bushy-browed actor could always be spotted somewhere on a topnotch crime show (Perry Mason (1957), The Defenders (1961) (recurring role), Judd for the Defense (1967), Mission: Impossible (1966), Mannix (1967), Ironside (1967), Quincy M.E. (1976), Matlock (1986)). He was given just as much footage sitting tall in the saddle in various western series (Laredo (1965), The Rifleman (1958), The Virginian (1962), Bonanza (1959)). He also appeared more than a few times on Gunsmoke (1955) and McCloud (1970), which starred his good friend Dennis Weaver.

The last few years of his life were marred by failing health and the increasingly frail actor had to eventually be placed in a Sherman Oaks (California) care facility. He died there of complications from pneumonia and heart disease a little more than a week after his 87th birthday, on October 12, 2007.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1070 Post by nrobertb » Sat Mar 30, 2019 10:45 pm

Mary Louise Cecilia "Texas" Guinan (January 12, 1884 – November 5, 1933) was an American actress, producer and entrepreneur. Born in Texas to Irish immigrant parents, she decided at an early age to become an entertainer. Spending several years in California appearing in numerous productions, she eventually formed her own company.

What she is most remembered for are the speakeasy clubs she managed during Prohibition. Her clubs catered to the rich and famous, as well as to aspiring talent. After being arrested and indicted during a law enforcement sweep of speakeasy clubs, she was acquitted during her trial.

Initially finding work as a chorus girl, she adopted the stage name Texas Guinan to give herself an edge in the competitive marketplaces of vaudeville and New York theatre productions. Within a year, she had the female lead in a stage production of Simple Simon Simple, during which she accidentally shot herself on stage with a loaded gun. That same year, she placed an advertisement in newspapers offering $1,000 to any songwriter who provided her with a song of equal popularity to the Gus Edwards–penned "That's What the Rose Said to Me"

In a film career that began in 1917 and continued through 1933, she was part of the vanguard of women filmmakers in the United States. Triangle Film Corporation, featured Guinan in four two-reel shorts between 1917 and 1918. Unlike the musical genre she was known for on stage, she was now moving towards the Western movie genre, and on her dressing room door appeared a map of the state of Texas, rather than her name. Triangle began billing her as "the female Bill Hart" in reference to the industry's first Western star who at that time topped fandom popularity polls.

Frohman Brothers were Broadway producers. They made more than a dozen films with Guinan in 1918, including The Boss of the Rancho and The Heart of Texas. During her years with Bull's Eye Productions/Reelcraft, she began to expand towards the production end of film-making, as a unit department head on the films Outwitted, The Lady of the Law, The Girl of the Rancho, The Desert Vulture, and at least five other productions. She created Texas Guinan Productions in 1921 to produce Code of the West, Spitfire and Texas of the Mounted. After I Am the Woman and The Stampede for Victor Kremer Film Features, she returned to New York.

Guinan's give-and-take dialogue with nightclub customers inspired producer Nils Granlund to put together a full floor show with Guinan presiding as emcee for Ziegfeld Follies chorus girls. Bootleg huckster Larry Fay struck a deal with them to feature the show at his El Fey Club on West 47th Street in Manhattan. There, she became known for her catchphrase, "Hello, Sucker! Come on in and leave your wallet on the bar." In return for being the draw to attract wealthy and powerful clientele, Guinan received 50% of the profits. Ruby Keeler, Barbara Stanwyck and George Raft were discovered by talent scouts while working as dancers at the club. After being shut down by the police, she opened the Texas Guinan Club at 117 West 48th Street, also closed by the police.

During the Great Depression, she took her show on the road. She attempted to move to Europe, but Scotland Yard threatened to board her ship if she tried to land in England, where she was on their list of "barred aliens". The show was banned from France under labor technicalities.

While on the road with Too Hot for Paris, she contracted amoebic dysentery in Chicago, Illinois, during the epidemic in the Congress Hotel. She fell ill in Vancouver, British Columbia, and died there on November 5, 1933, age 49, exactly one month before Prohibition was repealed; 7,500 people attended her funeral.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1071 Post by nrobertb » Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:56 pm

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument is a U.S. National Monument that includes the area around Mount St. Helens in Washington. It was established on August 27, 1982 by U.S. President Ronald Reagan following the 1980 eruption. The 110,000 acre National Volcanic Monument was set aside for research, recreation, and education. Inside the Monument, the environment is left to respond naturally to the disturbance. Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument was the United States' first such monument managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Many trails, viewpoints, information stations, campgrounds, and picnic areas have been established to accommodate the increasing number of visitors each year.

Beginning in 1983, visitors have been able to drive to Windy Ridge, only 4 miles northeast of the crater. Mountain climbing to the summit of the volcano has been allowed since 1986.

The Mount St. Helens Visitor Center at Silver Lake, about 30 miles (48 km) west of Mount St. Helens and five miles (8 km) east of Interstate 5 (outside the monument), opened in 1987 and has been operated by the Washington State Park System since October 2000. Exhibits include the area's culture and history, and the natural history and geology of the volcano and the eruption, including the recovery of the area's vegetation and animal life. The Center includes a theater, a gift shop and outdoor trails. By the end of 1989, the Center had hosted more than 1.5 million visitors. A small admission fee is charged.

The Johnston Ridge Observatory is located 52 miles east of Castle Rock, Washington, at the end of Washington State Route 504, four miles from the mountain. Exhibits focus on the geologic history of the volcano, eyewitness accounts of the explosion, and the science of monitoring volcanic activity. Two movies and ranger-led programs are available every hour. A half-mile paved trail provides views of the lava dome, crater, pumice plain, and landslide deposit, with access to hiking trails in the restricted area. The observatory is located near the site of volcanologist David A. Johnston's camp on the morning of May 18, 1980, and opened in 1993.

The Coldwater Ridge Visitor Center in the Coldwater Lake area opened in 1993, operated by the Forest Service, but closed in November 2007 due to a lack of funding. The center reopened as the Science and Learning Center at Coldwater in May 2013, operating as an educational facility and conference center in cooperation with the Mount St. Helens Institute. It is open to the public on weekends from 10am to 6pm. Many of the exhibits have been removed, but the gift shop, theatre, and some signage still exist.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1072 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 01, 2019 12:41 pm

The Gallatin River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 120 mi, in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. It is one of three rivers, along with the Jefferson and Madison, that converge near Three Forks, Montana, to form the Missouri.

It rises in the northwest corner of Yellowstone National Park, in northwestern Wyoming, in the Gallatin Range of the Rocky Mountains. It flows northwest through Gallatin National Forest, past Big Sky, Montana, and joins the Jefferson and Madison approximately 30 mi northwest of Bozeman. U.S. Highway 191 follows the river from the Wyoming border to just outside Bozeman.

The river was named in July 1805 by Meriwether Lewis at Three Forks. The eastern fork of the three, it was named for Albert Gallatin, the U.S. Treasury Secretary from 1801–14. The western fork was named for President Thomas Jefferson and the central fork for Secretary of State James Madison.

The Gallatin River is one of the best whitewater runs in the Yellowstone-Teton Area. In June, when the snowmelt is released from the mountains, the river has a class IV section called the "Mad Mile". This section is over a mile long and contains continuous stretches of challenging whitewater. Rafting companies offer trips on this river – on the Mad Mile Section as well as other less challenging sections.

The Gallatin River is an amazingly scenic river – winding through high alpine meadows, dropping into the rocky Gallatin Canyon, and flowing out into the Gallatin Valley. It is an exceptionally popular fly fishing destination for rainbow trout, brown trout and mountain whitefish. Portions of the river are designated as a Blue Ribbon trout stream while the remainder is designated Red Ribbon by the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Department.

Parts of the movie A River Runs Through It were filmed on the Gallatin.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1073 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:09 am

Henry Nicholson Morse (1835-1912), "bloodhound of the far west," was an Old West lawman. Elected September 2, 1863 served from 1864 to 1878, as the sheriff of the Alameda County Sheriff's Office of Alameda County, California. He later founded the Harry N. Morse Detective Agency in California. One of his accomplishments was to help (along with his associate James Hume) identify Charles E. Boles as the perpetrator of the Black Bart stagecoach robberies. Other notable early California outlaws he helped bring to justice include Bartolo Sepulveda, Narrato Ponce, "Red-Handed Procopio, and Juan Soto.

Morse made his reputation by breaking up the gangs of Hispanic bandidos that infested central and southern California in the 1860s and 1870s. He shot and killed the notorious outlaw Narato Ponce after fighting two desperate gun duels with him, wounding Ponce in the first fight, then tracking him down and killing him in a second shootout months later. He captured Procopio Bustamante, nephew of the legendary Joaquin Murrieta, in a San Francisco brothel in 1872. He tracked the Tiburcio Vasquez gang for two months and 2700 miles, finally locating him in an adobe house in what is now West Hollywood. Morse provided the tip to Los Angeles County Sheriff Billy Rowland, whose posse captured Vasquez in 1874. After leaving the post of Alameda County sheriff in 1878, he formed his own private detective agency. In 1883 he captured Charles E. Boles, better known as Black Bart, the Poet Highwayman, in San Francisco. He broke up the Harkins Opium Smuggling Ring which resulted in the prosecution of a corrupt federal magistrate in San Francisco. He investigated San Francisco's Dupont Street Frauds case of the 1880s, exposing the corruption of the city's mayor, Andrew J. Bryant. He worked on the defense of Theodore Durrant, the "Beast in the Belfry" who committed several sex murders in San Francisco. Durrant was convicted and executed on the gallows in San Quentin. His last big case was the poisoning death of Jane Stanford, founder of Stanford University, in 1905.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1074 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:22 pm

More spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1075 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 03, 2019 9:33 am

Desert bighorn sheep is a subspecies that is native to the deserts of the USA's intermountain west and southwestern regions, as well as northwestern Mexico.
The range of Desert bighorn sheep includes habitats in the Mojave Desert, Colorado Desert, and Sonoran Desert. Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Joshua Tree National Park, Death Valley National Park, Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, and Mojave National Preserve all offer protected habitat for this animal.

Populations of the desert bighorn sheep declined drastically with European colonization of the American Southwest beginning in the 16th century. These declines were followed by a period of population stabilization ascribed to conservation measures. As of 2004, desert bighorn sheep numbers remained extremely low, although the overall population trend had increased since 1960.

Desert bighorn sheep are stocky, heavy-bodied sheep, similar in size to mule deer. Weights of mature rams range from 115 to 280 pounds (52 to 127 kg), while ewes are somewhat smaller. Due to their unique concave elastic hooves, bighorn are able to climb the steep, rocky terrain of the desert mountains with speed and agility. They rely on their keen eyesight to detect potential predators, such as mountain lions, coyotes, and bobcats, and they use their climbing ability to escape.

Both genders develop horns soon after birth, with horn growth continuing more or less throughout life. Older rams have curling horns measuring over three feet long with more than one foot of circumference at the base. The ewes' horns are much smaller and lighter and do not tend to curl. After eight years of growth, the horns of an adult ram may weigh more than 30 pounds. Annual growth rings indicate the animal's age. The rams may rub their own horns to improve their field of view. Both rams and ewes use their horns as tools to break open cactus, which they consume, and for fighting.

Desert bighorn sheep typically live for 10–20 years. The typical diet of a desert bighorn sheep is mainly grasses. When grasses are unavailable, they turn to other food sources, such as sedges, forbs, or cacti.

The desert bighorn has become well adapted to living in the desert heat and cold and, unlike most mammals, their body temperature can safely fluctuate several degrees. During the heat of the day, they often rest in the shade of trees and caves.

Southern desert bighorn sheep are adapted to a desert mountain environment with little or no permanent water. Some may go without visiting water for weeks or months, sustaining their body moisture from food and from rainwater collected in temporary rock pools. They may have the ability to lose up to 30% of their body weight and still survive. After drinking water, they quickly recover from their dehydrated condition. Wildlife ecologists are just beginning to study the importance of this adaptive strategy, which has allowed small bands of desert bighorns to survive in areas too dry for many of their predators.

Rams battle to determine the dominant animal, which then gains possession of the ewes. Facing each other, rams charge head-on from distances of 20 ft or more, crashing their massive horns together with tremendous impact, until one or the other ceases. Bighorn sheep live in separate ram and ewe bands most of the year. They gather during the breeding season (usually July–October), but breeding may occur anytime in the desert due to suitable climatic conditions. Gestation lasts 150–180 days, and the lambs are usually born in late winter.

The number of desert bighorn sheep in North America in pristine times is unknown, but most likely was in the tens of thousands. In 1929, E.T. Seton estimated the pre-Columbian numbers of all subspecies of bighorn sheep in North America at 1.5-2.0 million. By 1960, however, the overall bighorn population in the United States, including desert bighorns, had dwindled to 15,000-18,200. Buechner documented major declines from the 1850s to the early 20th century. These declines were attributed to excessive hunting; competition and diseases from domestic livestock, particularly domestic sheep; usurpation of watering areas and critical range by human activities; and human-induced habitat changes.

Desert bighorn sheep populations have trended upward since the 1960s when their population was estimated at 6,700-8,100. The upward trend was caused by conservation measures, including habitat preservation. In 1980, desert bighorn sheep populations were estimated at 8,415-9,040. A state-by-state survey was conducted a few years later and estimated the overall US desert bighorn sheep population at 15,980.

When I worked at Willow Beach, AZ in 1964 the sheep were seldom seen and very wary, staying well away from the developed area. When I returned for a visit three years ago I was able to sit in my car and watch a band of rams and ewes from a few feet away. A couple were wearing radio collars.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1076 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 03, 2019 4:55 pm

Texas barbecue traditions can be divided into four general styles: East Texas, Central Texas, South Texas, and West Texas. The Central and East Texas varieties are generally the most well-known.

Additionally, in deep South Texas and along the Rio Grande valley, a Mexican style of meat preparation known as barbacoa can be found. In Spanish, the word barbacoa means "barbecue", though in English it is often used specifically to refer to Mexican varieties of preparation.

East Texas style: The meat is slowly cooked to the point that it is "falling off the bone." It is typically cooked over hickory wood and marinated in a sweet, tomato-based sauce.
Central Texas style: The meat is rubbed with only salt and black pepper or in some restaurants with spices and cooked over indirect heat from pecan or oak wood or mesquite wood or a combination of woods. Sauce is typically considered unneeded but may be served on the side.
West Texas style: The meat is cooked over direct heat from mesquite wood.
South Texas style: Features thick, molasses-like sauces that keep the meat very moist.
The barbacoa tradition is somewhat different from all of these. Though beef may be used, goat or sheep meat are common as well (sometimes the entire animal may be used). In its most traditional form, barbacoa is prepared in a hole dug in the ground and covered with maguey leaves.[4]

Barbecue in the border area between the South Texas Plains and Northern Mexico is mostly influenced by Mexican cuisine. Historically, this area was the birthplace of the Texas ranching tradition. Often, Mexican farmhands were partially paid for their work in less desirable cuts of meat, such as the diaphragm and the cow's head. It is the cow's head which defines South Texas barbecue (called barbacoa). The head would be wrapped in wet maguey leaves and buried in a pit with hot coals for several hours, after which the meat would be pulled off for barbacoa tacos.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1077 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 04, 2019 9:29 am

Modern version of a 3/4 Looped Seat Bitter Root saddle
Circa - 1900 Wyoming, Colorado, Montana
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1078 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 04, 2019 4:01 pm

I think this is a neat boot rack. Simple to make if you can weld.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1079 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 05, 2019 3:38 pm

More spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1080 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:20 am

Great western character actors:
Hank Patterson was born in Springville, Alabama to Green and Mary Newton Patterson. Hank's great-grandfather, James Pearson, was an original settler of St. Clair County, AL as was his mother's great-grandfather, Thomas Newton. Between 1894 & 1897, the family left AL to live in Taylor, Texas, where Hank attempted to work as a serious musician, only to settle for playing piano in traveling vaudeville shows. He worked his way out to California in the 1920s and here began his film career followed by long runs on two television series Gunsmoke (1955) and Green Acres (1965).
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