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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1216 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 15, 2019 12:42 pm

Two Al Furstnow shoulder holsters.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1217 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 16, 2019 2:24 pm

More of Furstnow's work, chaps this time.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1218 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:03 pm

Blue Mounds State Park is a state park of Minnesota, USA, in Rock County near the town of Luverne. It protects an American bison herd which grazes on one of the state's largest prairie remnants.

The state park is named after a linear escarpment of Precambrian Sioux Quartzite bedrock, which although pink in color, is said to have appeared blueish in the distance to early settlers. Parts of the cliff are up to 100 feet high. Unusual in the surrounding prairie landscape, they are a popular site for rock climbing.

The park also preserves a 1,250-foot-long line of rocks aligned by Plains Indians which marks where the sun rises and sets on the spring and fall equinoxes. It also has a small reservoir for swimming, the only lake in Rock County.

Four structures and one building in the park, built by the Works Progress Administration in the 1930s, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In addition to bison herds, the park is home to a small population of coyotes and deer as well as various birds.

According to local folklore the mound was used as a buffalo jump before European settlement, but no archaeological evidence has yet been found as verification. The soil of the mound was too thin and boulder-strewn for farming, saving it from the plow, although it was grazed.

Parkland was originally established north of the Blue Mound for the purpose of providing work relief during the Great Depression and water recreation. WPA crews built two dams on Mound Creek, creating Upper and Lower Mound Lake and facilities such as picnic grounds and a beach house.

In 1989 the WPA developments were listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district. The district contains five contributing properties—four structures and one building: Upper Dam, Upper Mound Lake, Lower Dam, Lower Mound Lake (all created in 1938) and a latrine (built 1939–42) located by the current cart-in campground. They are considered historically significant as examples of New Deal federal work relief and recreational development in southwestern Minnesota, and architecturally significant for their unique National Park Service rustic design using Sioux Quartzite. The two dams are particularly noteworthy, blending into the natural rock walls of the creek, an exceptional application of rustic style to utilitarian structures.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1219 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jul 17, 2019 7:03 pm

Western saddle at Garza County Historical Museum in Post, Texas,
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1220 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:49 am

Grand Portage State Park is a state park at the northeastern tip of Minnesota, on the Canada–United States border. It contains a 120-foot waterfall, the tallest in the state (though it is on the border with Canada and thus partially in Ontario), on the Pigeon River. The High Falls and other waterfalls and rapids upstream necessitated a historically important portage on a fur trade route between the Great Lakes and inland Canada. This 8.5-mile path plus the site of forts on either end are preserved in nearby Grand Portage National Monument. The state park, held by the surrounding Grand Portage Indian Reservation and leased to the state of Minnesota for $1 a year, is the only U.S. state park jointly managed by a state and a Native American band. It is also the only Minnesota state park not owned by the state.

From 2 million years ago to 10,000 years ago a series of glacial periods repeatedly covered the region with ice, scouring the bedrock and scooping out a great basin. The hard diabase intrusions were more resistant to the ice and survived as a network of ridges. At the end of the last glacial period the basin filled with meltwater, forming Glacial Lake Minong, Lake Superior's precursor. Freed from the weight of the glaciers, the surrounding land gradually rose. This post-glacial rebound plus draining of the lake caused the shoreline to recede, first exposing the ridges of the park as islands, then leaving the entire area above water. The stages of shoreline recession are revealed by lake terraces composed of beach gravels. The sharp drop from the surrounding land to the lake produces the numerous waterfalls for which the North Shore is famous.

A mixed hardwood forest covers most of the park, chiefly paper birch and quaking aspen with occasional white spruce, eastern white pine, balsam fir, northern white cedar, poplar, and black ash. A more boreal forest appears on ridges and slopes, with black spruce joining the previously listed conifers intermixed with additional birch and aspen. Bottomlands near the river support black and green ash as well as white cedar, white spruce, and yellow birch.[

At the beginning of historical times Grand Portage and the Pigeon River lay along the border between Dakota land to the south and Cree to the north. By the early eighteenth century Ojibwe arrived in the area, expanding as middlemen in the fur trade with the French.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1221 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 19, 2019 9:40 am

A Damascus hunting knife:
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1222 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 20, 2019 11:02 am

Great western character actors: Leif Erickson was born on October 27, 1911 in Alameda, California, USA as William Y. Wycliffe Anderson. He was an actor, known for On the Waterfront (1954), The High Chaparral (1967) and The Carpetbaggers (1964). He was married to Ann Diamond, Margaret Hayes and Frances Farmer. He died on January 29, 1986 in Pensacola, Florida, USA.

During the mid nineteen sixties, when roles became scarce, he became a yacht broker at Marina Del Rey, CA.
Studied at USC in California and first worked as a singer and trombonist with Ted Fio Rito and His orchestra. In films from 1933, often in westerns based on Zane Grey novels. Appeared under the name Glenn Erickson early in his career, but, because of his Nordic appearance, his first name was changed to Leif by 1938. Played a succession of stalwart marshals and sheriffs, as well as Deborah Kerr's insensitive husband in 'Tea and Sympathy' (1956). Best known as cattle rancher Big John Cannon in TV's 'The High Chaparral' (1967-1971).
Served four years in the Navy during World War II as a combat photographer.
Was twice shot down while in aircraft, both times he was wounded.
Visited US soldiers fighting in Vietnam.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1223 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 21, 2019 4:12 pm

Great River Bluffs State Park is a state park of Minnesota, on the Mississippi River southeast of Winona. The park preserves steep-sided bluffs rising 500 feet above the river and the narrow valleys between them, which support rare and fragile plant communities. Two of the bluffs have received further protection under the Minnesota Scientific and Natural Areas program, which are known as King's and Queen's Bluff Scientific and Natural Area.

The region lies on sedimentary rock layers deposited on the floor of a shallow sea 500 million years ago. The lower, older layer is sandstone overlain by more recent dolomite rock. Much later a deep channel was carved into this stone by the ancient Mississippi River, which 10,000 years ago was greatly swollen from the melting glaciers to the north. The softer sandstone was eroded more easily, undercutting the dolomite on both banks of the river. The dolomite fractured off along vertical joints, leaving sheer rock faces still visible today. Side streams flowing into the Mississippi cut gullies into the river banks, creating a series of bluffs capped with erosion-resistant dolomite.

European settlers had cleared much of the land for farming, but this led to significant erosion on the steep slopes. The state forestry division had been planting nonnative as well as native trees to curtail the erosion and produce harvestable timber. Under the Division of Parks and Recreation, the plantations of nonnatives like red pine went against the policy of restoring a natural habitat. As a compromise, the nonnative trees are being harvested as they reach maturity and are being replaced with more appropriate vegetation.

High up on the sides of several bluffs are rare habitats called goat prairies by locals, because they are so steep it would seem only goats could graze on them. These patches of prairie grow only on slopes between 40 and 50 degrees which face south to southwest. This orientation catches prodigious amounts of sunlight, which in winter means the ground thaws daily and freezes nightly, retarding the establishment of any woody plants.

The park also contains a relict stand of northern white cedar on Queen's Bluff, well south of its normal distribution. It arose during glacial periods and survived the subsequent warming of the local climate.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1224 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jul 22, 2019 11:23 am

Robbers Cave State Park is a state park in Latimer County, Oklahoma. It is located 5 miles north of Wilburton, Oklahoma, on State Highway 2. Originally named Latimer State Park, it received its current name in 1936. It is located in the scenic, hilly woodlands of the Sans Bois Mountains of southeast Oklahoma. This park is a favorite of rappellers, equestrians, hikers and outdoor lovers. The park and adjoining wildlife management area covers more than 8,000 acres and includes three lakes. It offers visitors acres of discovery and enjoyment including trout fishing in season, boating, hunting, mountain biking, trails for hikers and horses, sandstone cliffs for climbing and rappelling, and fall foliage viewing. In addition, Robbers Cave is historically notable as a former hideout for infamous outlaws Belle Starr and Jesse James.

The area surrounding the present-day park has been a hunting ground for hundreds of years. Archaeological evidence suggests that the earliest people were related to the builders of the Spiro Mounds. By the 1600s, the Osage and Caddo tribes dominated the area. French hunters and explorers also visited, leaving their mark by naming some of the prominent geographic features, which are still used.

After the Civil War, this area became legendary for sheltering fugitives from the law. Some of these included Jesse James and Belle Starr. Other fugitives included the Dalton Gang, the Youngers and the Rufus Buck Gang.

In 1929, Carlton Weaver, an editor and politician from Wilburton, donated 120 acres of land near Robbers Cave to the Boy Scouts of America for a campground. The warden of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary arranged for skilled prison inmates to construct camp improvements, including a kitchen and several other buildings, from rock quarried nearby.

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was organized in 1933. Supervised by the National Park Service, the CCC built a bathhouse, cabins, trails, group camps, shelters, and roads. In 1937, CCC and the Works Progress Administration (WPA) created Lake Carlton.

In 1987, the park initiated the first annual Robbers Cave Fall Festival, and the Robbers Cave Bluegrass Festival began in 1988. In 1994, Oklahoma converted the bathhouse to a nature center. The park was added to the National Register of Historic Places (NR 96000489) in 2002.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1225 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jul 23, 2019 11:15 pm

The Rufus Buck Gang was an outlaw multi-racial gang whose members were part African American and part Creek Indian. They operated in the Indian Territory of the Arkansas-Oklahoma area from 1895 to 1896.

Formed by Rufus Buck, the gang consisted also of Lewis Davis, Sam Sampson, Maoma July, and Lucky Davis. The gang began building up a small stockpile of weapons while staying in Okmulgee, Oklahoma. After killing U.S. deputy marshal John Garrett on July 30, 1895, the gang began holding up various stores and ranches in the Fort Smith area during the next two weeks. In one incident, a salesman named Callahan – after being robbed – was offered a chance to escape if he could outrun the gang. When the elderly Callahan successfully escaped, the gang killed his assistant in frustration. At least two women victims who were raped by the gang died of their injuries.

List of crimes committed by the gang
July 30, 1895: Killing of US Deputy Marshal John Garrett
July 31, 1895: Coming across a white man and his daughter in a wagon, the gang held the man at gunpoint and took the girl.
They killed a black boy and beat Ben Callahan until they mistakenly believed he was dead, then took Callahan's boots, money, and saddle.
Robbing of country stores of West and J. Norrberg at Orket, Oklahoma
Murder of two white women and a 14-year-old girl
August 4: Rape of a Mrs Hassan near Sapulpa, Oklahoma Hassan and two of three other female victims of the gang—a Miss Ayres and an Indian girl near Sapulpa—also died; a fourth victim, Mrs Wilson, was reported to have recovered; it is reported that, after their capture, the gang was almost lynched.

Continuing attacks on both local settlers and Creek indiscriminately, the gang was captured outside Muskogee by a combined force of lawmen and Indian police of the Creek Light Horse, led by Marshal S. Morton Rutherford, on August 10. While the Creek wanted to hold the gang for trial the men were brought before "Hanging" Judge Isaac Parker. He twice sentenced them to death, the first sentence not being carried out due to an unsuccessful appeal to the Supreme Court. They were hanged on July 1, 1896 at 1 pm at Fort Smith.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1226 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jul 24, 2019 6:25 pm

Some Buermann spurs:
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1227 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:54 pm

This photo shows the transition to more advancing technology; these Winchester warriors wear cartridge belts stuffed with modern-era smokeless powder rifle cartridges. (Standing, from left) Alexander Carnes, Sam McKenzie and Arthur Beech. (Seated, from left) Tom Ross, Albert Mace and John R. Hughes.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1228 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jul 26, 2019 3:11 pm

Cottonwood Canyon State Park, established in 2013, is the second largest state park in Oregon, encompassing 8,000 acres on the lower John Day River.

Park headquarters, about a two-hour drive east of Portland, is adjacent to Oregon Route 206 between Wasco and Condon. The river, which here forms the boundary between Sherman County on the west and Gilliam County on the east, meanders for 16 miles through the arid park.

The walls of the main canyon reach to 1,920 feet above sea level within the park, which also includes four side canyons: Hay Creek, Esau, Rattlesnake, and Cottonwood. These and the main canyon are flanked by grassland, sagebrush shrub-steppe, river bottom, and cliffs composed mainly of basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group.

Hiking, camping, fishing, and river rafting are among the recreation possibilities in the park. A campground with 21 primitive sites, 7 sites for hikers and bikers, a group camping area, potable water, and a restroom are near the park headquarters and the information building. Hiking trails include Pinnacles, in Sherman County, and Lost Corral, in Gilliam County, each of which follows the river downstream for 4.3 miles. On the upstream side of the highway, the Hard Stone Trail follows the river for 1.5 miles. In addition, old ranching roads that cross the park double as hiking trails, and an adjacent 10,000 acres of public land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management offer further possibilities for hiking.

Horse trails wind through the Gilliam County segment of the park. The J. S. Burres day-use area, also in the Gilliam County segment, is a put-in place for boaters heading downriver and a take-out place for commercial and private groups running the John Day between Clarno and Route 206.\

The largest herd of California bighorn sheep live in the area, as do Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer, pronghorn, coyotes, and many smaller mammals. A variety of snakes, including the western rattlesnake, live in the park, which is also home to several lizard species. Frogs, toads, and waterfowl can be found near the river. Fish in the river include Chinook salmon, steelhead, catfish, carp and smallmouth bass.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1229 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jul 27, 2019 10:36 am

Great western character actors: Tol Avery was born on August 28, 1915 in Fort Worth, Texas, USA as Taliaferro Ware Avery. He was an actor, known for G.E. True (1962), Hawaiian Eye (1959) and Buchanan Rides Alone (1958). He was married to Yvonne Tanchuck. He died on August 27, 1973 in Los Angeles County, California, USA.
Enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army on 27 May 1942 during World War II. He became a 2nd Lieutenant with Armed Forces Radio.
According to an obituary, he was a past president of the California Professional Hypnotists Association.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1230 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jul 28, 2019 10:41 am

Great western character actors: Lane Bradford was born on August 29, 1922 in Yonkers, New York, USA as John Myrtland Le Varre Jr. He is known for his work on Zombies of the Stratosphere (1952), The Invisible Monster (1950) and The Toughest Gun in Tombstone (1958). He was married to Mary Schrock and Joan Irene Velin. He died on June 7, 1973 in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

Retired to Hawaii after his last film appearance in 1968 and learned to play the guitar and ukulele. Was living on his boat in Honolulu in 1973 when he suffered a cerebral hemorrhage. He was rushed to a local hospital but died shortly after.
Best known on screen in the 1940's and 50's for playing western badmen.

Was the stuntman for Bill Elliott in Bullets for Bandits (1942), and performed one of the greatest stunts of all time in western films--underneath a team of hitched horses.

Served in the US Army during World War II.
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