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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1321 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 29, 2019 9:44 am

The Broadmoor Pikes Peak Cog Railway is an Abt rack system cog railway with 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in standard gauge track in Colorado, USA, climbing the well-known mountain Pikes Peak. The base station is in Manitou Springs, Colorado near Colorado Springs.

The railway is the highest in North America by a considerable margin. It was built and operated solely for the tourist trade. As of February 2019, the railway will remain closed until 2021, when it will be reopened with new equipment.

The railway was started by Zalmon G. Simmons, inventor and founder of the Simmons Beautyrest Mattress Company. The company was founded in 1889 and limited service to the Halfway House Hotel was started in 1890. On June 30, 1891, the first train reached the summit.

A gasoline-powered railcar #7 was constructed in 1938. It was designed to be a cheaper alternative to the steam locomotives enabling economic service during quieter times of the year. Proving a huge success, the railway soon bought more internal combustion engined trains.

In 1964 the railway needed more equipment, but General Electric was not interested in the business. The railway went abroad, to Switzerland, home of most of the world's cog railways. In 1964, the Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works in Winterthur provided two bright red railcars (railcars contain a seating compartment as well as engineer stand, eliminating the need for a separate pushing locomotive), very similar to equipment used on many Swiss railways. .

As tourism increased in the 1970s the railway needed more capacity. In 1976 M&PPRy took delivery of two larger two-car articulated railcars from the Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works of Winterthur, designated Train 18 and Train 19. Passing sidings were built in several places at about the same time, allowing trains to pass at various points on the mountainside. Trains could previously pass only at the Mountain View siding, permitting only three trains a day up the mountain. Eight trains per day became possible with the new equipment and sidings.

On June 13, 2018, the Manitou Springs City Council approved a pair of tax incentives to fund repairs of the railway. On November 29, 2018, it was announced that the tax incentives had been approved, and that reconstruction would begin in Spring 2019 for a projected 2021 reopening; the project will see all track replaced, the Manitou Springs depot remodeled, and Cars 14-17 retired in favor of three new railcars each with a capacity of 240; Cars 18-19 and 24-25 will be refurbished and remain in service
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1322 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 29, 2019 5:55 pm

Many of the small western mines used little hand pushed railroad cars to bring the waste rock out of the mine and dump it. Around 1974 a friend and I tried to pull one of these little cars out of the entrance to a silver mine in American Fork Canyon, Utah with the winch on a Toyota 4-wheeler. Unfortunately, it was stuck firm in mud and we gave up rather than damage the winch. A few months later the mine entrance collapsed and buried the car under tons of rock, where it remains today.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1323 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 29, 2019 8:32 pm

Back in 1974 I scavenged this nameplate from an air compressor that had been used to provide fresh air to an abandoned silver mine in American Fork Canyon, Utah. If you want to see one of these beasts in action, check out this U-tube video: ingersoll rand er1 air compressor
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1324 Post by nrobertb » Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:27 pm

Antler items such as chandeliers are very much in demand for western decor and can be quite pricey. Quite a few people supplement their income by hunting for shed antlers and selling them to craftsmen.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1325 Post by nrobertb » Thu Oct 31, 2019 5:08 pm

A Fallis show saddle:
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1326 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 01, 2019 10:01 am

The Wallowa Mountains are a mountain range located in the Columbia Plateau of northeastern Oregon in the United States. The range runs approximately 40 miles northwest to southeast in southwestern Wallowa County and eastern Union County between the Blue Mountains to the west and the Snake River to the east. The range is sometimes considered to be an eastern spur of the Blue Mountains, and it is known as the "Alps of Oregon". Much of the range is designated as the Eagle Cap Wilderness, part of the Wallowa–Whitman National Forest.

The range is drained by the Wallowa River, which flows from the north side of the mountains, and its tributary the Minam River, which flows through the west side of the range. The Imnaha River flows from the east side of the range.

The highest point in the range is Sacajawea Peak, which is 9,838 feet above sea level. Sacajawea is the sixth highest mountain in Oregon and the state's highest peak outside of the Cascade Range.

At low elevations, Douglas fir is the most common tree for slopes, whereas Engelmann spruce and lodgepole pine occur in valley bottoms, with grand fir common below 5,300 feet. In meadows and around springs and seeps, willows and sedge grow. Above 7,000 feet, subalpine fir is dominant, and whitebark pine is often found on ridges and south-facing slopes.

The area was home to the Wallowa band of the Lower Nez Perce. The Nez Perce lived in the canyons and burned trees to create meadows for the horses that they obtained around 1730. In 1834, Captain Bonneville crossed through the mountains and met with the lower Nez Perce on his way to Fort Walla Walla. In the 1840s, people began to move west, bringing settlers through the land. The Nez Perce began to trade with these settlers. A settlement in the mountains was built in 1861. In 1863, a new treaty was signed that relinquished lands that granted by an 1855 treaty, turning them over to the American government. This same year, the settlers in the mountains moved to present-day La Grande. These lands included the Wallowa Valley, home of Chief Joseph. The government first opened the Wallowa Valley to settlement in 1867. Surveyors began to come through and would continue until 1869. The Wallowa Valley was partitioned in 1873, with one half for the Nez Perce and the other for settlers. Two years later, in 1875, the government banned the Nez Perce from the valley. The first road into the valley, a toll road, was constructed the same year. The U.S. Government attempted to force the removal of the Nez Perce in 1877; however, this angered the natives, who chose instead to raid the settlers, leading to the Nez Perce War.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1327 Post by nrobertb » Fri Nov 01, 2019 11:21 pm

When J.W Martin made this saddle, his town of Vinita was in the Indian Territories, today Oklahoma.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1328 Post by nrobertb » Sat Nov 02, 2019 9:49 pm

The Superstition Mountains, popularly called "The Superstitions, is a range of mountains in Arizona located to the east of the Phoenix metropolitan area. They are anchored by Superstition Mountain, a large mountain that is a popular recreation destination for residents of the Phoenix, Arizona area.

The Superstition Mountains are bounded roughly by U.S. Route 60 on the south, Arizona State Route 88 on the northwest, and Arizona State Route 188 on the northeast.

The mountain range is in the federally designated Superstition Wilderness Area, and includes a variety of natural features in addition to its namesake mountain. Weavers Needle, a prominent landmark and rock climbing destination set behind and to the east of Superstition Mountain, is a tall eroded volcanic remnan] that plays a significant role in the legend of the Lost Dutchman's Gold Mine.

As with most of the terrain surrounding the Phoenix metropolitan area, the Superstition Mountains have a desert climate, with high summer temperatures and a handful of perennial sources of water. The elevation in the more remote, eastern portion of the wilderness is higher than the western portion, which lowers temperatures slightly. Numerous hiking trails cross the mountains from multiple access points, including the Peralta Trailhead, the most popular. The Lost Dutchman State Park, located on the west side of Superstition Mountain, includes several short walking trails.

Peralta Canyon, on the northeast side of Superstition Mountain, contains a popular trail that leads up to Fremont Saddle, which provides a very picturesque view of Weavers Needle. Miner's Needle is another prominent formation in the wilderness and a popular hiking destination.

The Superstition Mountains have a maximum elevation of 6,266 ft and prominence of 1,706 ft at Mound Mountain in the far eastern section of the range.

The legend of the Lost Dutchman's Gold Mine centers around the Superstition Mountains. According to the legend, a German immigrant named Jacob Waltz discovered a mother lode of gold in the Superstition Wilderness and revealed its location on his deathbed in Phoenix in 1891 to Julia Thomas, a boarding-house owner who had taken care of him for many years. Several mines have been claimed to be the actual mine that Waltz discovered, but none of those claims have been verified. The legends and lore of the Superstition Mountains can be experienced at the Superstition Mountain Museum on the Apache Trail where artifacts of the Lost Dutchman are on display.

Some Apaches believe that the hole leading down into the lower world, or hell, is located in the Superstition Mountains. Winds blowing from the hole are supposed to be the cause of severe dust storms in the metropolitan region.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1329 Post by nrobertb » Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:52 am

Wyoming Centennial spurs by Randy Butters.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1330 Post by nrobertb » Sun Nov 03, 2019 12:19 pm

I wondered when the Conway buckle, which is used on saddles, was invented. A man named Conway was granted a patent for one in 1882. Here is some more info. from another forum:

Part of the problem is the buckle which is primarily a HARNESS buckle was in use prior to the turn of the twentieth century. Although it is known as a Conway buckle today, it has also been known as a loop buckle. Used as a quick adjustment on harness hip drops and pole tugs. I have been a saddler for many years and like I said I have restored a lot of team harness and I have seen some really old harness. My chuckwagon dates to the 1890s and the old harness with it had Conway type buckles on it although the harness date of manufacture is unknown.
The Army in 1916 lists Conway buckles as part of the riding harness for English Artillery draft harness..
I do not know exactly when the Conway or loop buckle became used commonly but I do know that as of 1916 it was in use in the English Army.
I would suspect that its use in general Harness work was wide spread before that.
As far as its use in holster making, over the years I have found saddles made in ways that used technology that according to the text books wasn't around at the time.The old saddle makers were geniuses when it came to innovation,so I am sure that if they saw a use for a loop buckle and had one on hand they would have used it. I also have some single post harness buckles that resemble the conway loop buckle that date to the civil war.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1331 Post by nrobertb » Mon Nov 04, 2019 3:16 pm

Great western character actors:
John Litel's tough, no-nonsense demeanor on screen was not entirely due to his skill as an actor--when World War I broke out he enlisted in the French army, not wanting to wait until the US entered, and was twice decorated for bravery. Returning to the US after the war, he enrolled in the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and toured with various stage companies, making his film debut in 1929. He was one of what was called the "Warner Bros. Stock Company" in the 1930s--with such character actors as Ward Bond, Frank McHugh, Joan Blondell, George Tobias, Henry O'Neill and Alan Hale, among others--and he appeared in dozens of films there, often as a tough police captain, hard-nosed district attorney, no-nonsense business executive and other such authority figures. He could also convincingly play villains, as when he played the evil "Scorpion" in the classic serial Don Winslow of the Navy (1942). Always a solid, dependable character actor, Litel appeared in more than 200 films, sometimes playing leads but mainly as a supporting actor. From 1952-53 he played Robert Cummings' brooding boss Mr. Thackery in the NBC-TV sitcom My Hero (1952).

Portrayed a number of famous historical figures in several Warner Bros. shorts during his long career, including Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson and Robert E. Lee. The film Give Me Liberty (1936) with Litel as Henry won an Academy Award for best short. In it he managed to recite a long and complicated speech in one take. His short film on Jefferson entitled The Declaration of Independence (1938) also won an Oscar.
Retired in 1967 due to ill health.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1332 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:38 am

A farrier makes a living by putting shoes on horses or oxen and there are lots of tools of that trade. Some blacksmiths also did farrier work, some didn't. In 1900 you could go to your Sears Roebuck catalog and buy a ready made wooden box to hold your tools. However, most of those old boys just hammered together a few scrap boards and that did the job just fine.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1333 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 05, 2019 5:09 pm

A couple of pairs pf spurs. The snake spurs are by Jack Ferguson.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1334 Post by nrobertb » Tue Nov 05, 2019 5:15 pm

One of the farrier's tools was a butteris (or buttress). It was used for paring hoofs and generally has a shoulder stock and was blacksmith made.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1335 Post by nrobertb » Wed Nov 06, 2019 9:25 am

Sloan Canyon National Conservation Area is administered by the Bureau of Land Management. It includes the Sloan Petroglyph Site which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is located south of Las Vegas, Nevada, access is available from Las Vegas Boulevard, near the Del Webb Anthem development in Henderson. Sloan Canyon NCA protects 48,438 acres .
Sloan Canyon contains a great many petroglyphs and has been called the Sistine Chapel of Native American rock art due to their size and significance. Archaeologists believe the more than 300 rock art panels with 1,700 individual design elements were created by native cultures from the Archaic to historic eras.

The BLM currently maintains a policy of not publicizing the exact location of the petroglyphs due to recent problems with vandalism. Access to the NCA is further hampered by the rapid development of private land and to ongoing conflicts over land use and zoning.

Sloan Canyon NCA is (as of November 2006) closed to camping, shooting and offroad vehicle access, due to dumping and vandalism. Hiking, biking and horseback riding are encouraged on existing roads and trails.

The North McCullough Wilderness Area which covers the northern part of the McCullough Range is contained within the boundaries of the NCA.
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