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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1546 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:26 pm

If you are interested in saddles, check out this link to my latest utube video, where I talk about my Simco roping saddle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYDvlLIVln8
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1547 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 08, 2020 10:35 am

The San Francisco Peaks are a volcanic mountain range in San Francisco volcanic field in north central Arizona, just north of Flagstaff and a remnant of the former San Francisco Mountain. The highest summit in the range, Humphreys Peak, is the highest point in the state of Arizona at 12,633 feet in elevation. The San Francisco Peaks are the remains of an eroded stratovolcano. An aquifer within the caldera supplies much of Flagstaff's water while the mountain itself is in the Coconino National Forest, a popular recreation site. The Arizona Snowbowl ski area is on the western slopes of Humphreys

The six highest individual peaks in Arizona are contained in the range:
Humphreys Peak, 12,633 feet (3,851 m)
Agassiz Peak, 12,356 feet (3,766 m)
Fremont Peak, 11,969 feet (3,648 m)
Aubineau Peak, 11,838 feet (3,608 m)
Rees Peak, 11,474 feet (3,497 m)
Doyle Peak, 11,460 feet (3,493 m)

The mountain provides a number of recreational opportunities, including wintertime snow skiing and hiking the rest of the year. Hart Prairie is a popular hiking area and Nature Conservancy preserve located below the mountain's ski resort, Arizona Snowbowl.

Humphreys Peak and Agassiz Peak are the two farthest south-lying mountain peaks in the contiguous United States which rise to a height of more than 12,000 feet above sea level.

Prior to its collapse due to a lateral eruption to the northeast (around 200,000 years ago) and subsequent glacial erosion, the San Francisco Peaks fully matured elevation is estimated to have been around 16,000 feet.

In 1629, 147 years before San Francisco, California, received that name, Spanish friars founded a mission at a Hopi Indian village in honor of St. Francis, 65 miles from the peaks. Seventeenth century Franciscans at Oraibi village gave the name San Francisco to the peaks to honor St. Francis of Assisi, the founder of their order. The mountain man Antoine Leroux visited the San Francisco Peaks in the mid-1850s, and guided several American expeditions exploring and surveying northern Arizona. Leroux guided them to the only reliable spring, one on the western side of the peaks, which was later named Leroux Springs.

In 1898, U.S. President William McKinley established the San Francisco Mountain Forest Reserve, at the request of Gifford Pinchot, the head of the U.S. Division of Forestry. The local reaction was hostile—citizens of Williams, Arizona, protested and the Williams News editorialized that the reserve "virtually destroys Coconino County." In 1908, the San Francisco Mountain Forest Reserve became a part of the new Coconino National Forest.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1548 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 08, 2020 11:08 pm

The Don King Museum in Sheridan, WY.
Visitors are invited to browse and linger in the Don King Museum located off the Rope Shop.
The museum houses over three decades of the King family’s dedication to collecting Western and cowboy memorabilia from all over the world.

In addition to the hundreds of saddles that line the walls, the Don King Museum also showcases perfectly preserved wagons, coaches, Indian artifacts, guns, Western tack and original artwork. Open 8:00 AM-5:00 PM.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1549 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:02 pm

A nice crossdraw holster from Mike K Custom Leather.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1550 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 10, 2020 1:07 pm

Flathead Lake is a large natural lake in northwest Montana, and is the largest natural freshwater lake by surface area that is west of the source of the Missouri River in the contiguous United States.

The lake is a remnant of the ancient, massive glacial dammed lake, Lake Missoula of the era of the last interglacial. Flathead Lake is a natural lake along the mainline of the Flathead River. It was dammed in 1930 by Kerr Dam at its outlet on Polson Bay, and the lake level was raised by 10 feet. It is one of the cleanest lakes in the populated world for its size and type.

Located in the northwest corner of the state of Montana, 7 miles south of Kalispell, it is approximately 30 miles long and 16 miles wide, covering 197 square miles. It is a similar size as Minnesota's Mille Lacs Lake, but smaller than Red Lake. It is about half the area of San Francisco Bay (main bay). It is larger in surface area than Lake Tahoe, but it is much smaller in volume due to Tahoe's depth. Flathead Lake has a maximum depth of 370.7 ft and an average of 164.7 ft . This makes Flathead Lake deeper than the average depths of the Yellow Sea or the Persian Gulf. Flathead Lake is in a scenic part of Montana, southwest of Glacier National Park and is flanked by two scenic highways, which wind along its curving shoreline. On the west side is U.S. Route 93, and on the east is Route 35.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1551 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 11, 2020 12:39 pm

Great western character actors: James Gregory
New York-born James Gregory gave up a career as a stockbroker for one as an actor, and began on the Broadway stage. He made his film debut in 1948. Gregory specialized in playing loud, brash, tough cops or businessmen. One of his better roles was as the detective out to get Capone in Al Capone (1959). He also played Dean Martin's boss in three of the four cheesy "Matt Helm" spy films. Memorable as the opinionated, loudmouthed Inspector Luger in the television series Barney Miller (1975).

James Gregory made his Broadway debut in a production of "Key Largo". Over the next 16 years, he performed in approximately 25 Broadway productions. (His career was interrupted by World War II; he served for three years in the Navy and Marine Corps. His tour of duty took him to the Pacific where he spent 83 days on Okinawa.) One good thing that came out of the war years is that he married Anne in 1944, and they would stay together always. During his Broadway career, James Gregory earned consistently favorable reviews by drama critics from the New York Press, Boston Globe, New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Hollywood Reporter and Variety. James Gregory did a few TV spots as early as 1951, and in 1955 he made the transition from the Broadway stage to live television. The following year, after a couple of earlier uncredited movie appearances, he would also begin his movie career in earnest. He worked steadily throughout the early years of TV, working for major live television productions from New York to Hollywood. In 1959, James Gregory made television history by costarring in the pilot episode of the The Twilight Zone (1959); the episode "Where Is Everybody?" concerning the relevant topic of the USA winning the space race by sending a manned spaceship to the Moon sold the series. James Gregory would play Dean Martin's exasperated boss MacDonald in the first three of the Matt Helm movies: The Silencers (1966), Murderers' Row (1966) and The Ambushers (1967). He won his greatest acclaim as Inspector Frank Luger for the entire run of the TV series Barney Miller (1975) (1975-1982). This was his signature role; as the Inspector, he would be lovable, annoying, ingratiating, exasperating and humorous, sometimes all at the same time. He was Barney's buddy for seven years, and the series ended with the Inspector getting himself a mail-order bride. James Gregory retired from acting in 1983, with over 100 TV and movie credits.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1552 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 11, 2020 6:02 pm

Seth Kinman: Hunter, trapper, Indian fighter, pioneer, craftsman, musician, saloon and hotel proprietor.
Famous for his handcrafted elk-horn chairs and grizzly bear chair, all given to United States Presidents, James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln , Andrew Johnson and Rutherford Hayes, 1857-1876.
Seth stood six feet tall and weighed about 200 pounds. He claimed to have killed 50 Elk in one month, 240 in less than one year and 800 grizzly bears in his lifetime.
Early in 1888 he accidently shot himself, below the knee of one leg. The limb was amputated and he died from complications. Seth was buried in his buckskin clothes.

Here is a link to the sale of Seth's rifle in 2018.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXBqrz1MapE
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1553 Post by nrobertb » Sun Apr 12, 2020 2:55 pm

Forgotten western movies:
Union Pacific is a 1939 American dramatic western film directed by Cecil B. DeMille and starring Barbara Stanwyck and Joel McCrea. Based on the novel Trouble Shooter by Western fiction author Ernest Haycox, the film is about the building of the railroad of the same name across the American West.

Cast
Barbara Stanwyck ... Mollie Monahan
Joel McCrea ... Jeff Butler
Akim Tamiroff ... Fiesta
Robert Preston ... Dick Allen
Lynne Overman ... Leach Overmile
Brian Donlevy ... Sid Campeau
Robert Barrat ... Duke Ring
Anthony Quinn ... Cordray
Stanley Ridges ... Gen. Casement
Henry Kolker ... Asa M. Barrows
Francis McDonald ... Gen. Dodge
Willard Robertson ... Oakes Ames
Harold Goodwin ... Calvin
Evelyn Keyes ... Mrs. Calvin
Richard Lane ... Sam Reed
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1554 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 13, 2020 11:42 am

The Sierra Nevada is a mountain range in the Western United States, between the Central Valley of California and the Great Basin. The vast majority of the range lies in the state of California, although the Carson Range spur lies primarily in Nevada. The Sierra Nevada is part of the American Cordillera, a chain of mountain ranges that consists of an almost continuous sequence of such ranges that form the western "backbone" of North America, Central America, South America and Antarctica.

The Sierra runs 400 miles north-to-south, and is approximately 70 miles across east-to-west. Notable Sierra features include the General Sherman (tree), the largest tree in the world by volume; Lake Tahoe, the largest alpine lake in North America; Mount Whitney at 14,505 ft the highest point in the contiguous United States; and Yosemite Valley sculpted by glaciers from one-hundred-million-year-old granite, containing high waterfalls. The Sierra is home to three national parks, twenty wilderness areas, and two national monuments. These areas include Yosemite, Sequoia, and Kings Canyon National Parks; and Devils Postpile National Monument.

The character of the range is shaped by its geology and ecology. More than one hundred million years ago during the Nevadan orogeny, granite formed deep underground. The range started to uplift four million years ago, and erosion by glaciers exposed the granite and formed the light-colored mountains and cliffs that make up the range. The uplift caused a wide range of elevations and climates in the Sierra Nevada, which are reflected by the presence of five life zones (areas with similar plant and animal communities). Uplift continues due to faulting caused by tectonic forces, creating spectacular fault block escarpments along the eastern edge of the southern Sierra.

The Sierra Nevada has a significant history. The California Gold Rush occurred in the western foothills from 1848 through 1855. Due to inaccessibility, the range was not fully explored until 1912.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1555 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:29 am

A pair of spurs by Evans.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1556 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:38 pm

Here's a nice men's silver ring with turquoise and coral.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1557 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 15, 2020 10:24 am

The James River (also known as the Jim River or the Dakota River) is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 710 miles long, draining an area of 20,653 square miles in the states of North Dakota and South Dakota. About 70 percent of the drainage area is in South Dakota. The river provides the main drainage of the flat lowland area of the Dakotas between the two plateau regions known as the Coteau du Missouri and the Coteau des Prairies. This narrow area was formed by the James lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet during the last ice age, and as a consequence the watershed of the river is slender and it has few major tributaries for a river of its length.

The James drops approximately 5 inches per 1 mile, and this low gradient sometimes leads to reverse flow. Reverse flow occurs when high inflow from tributaries leads to James River water flowing upstream for several miles above the joining water. This happens most frequently north of Huron, South Dakota.

The river arises in Wells County, North Dakota, approximately 10 mi northwest of Fessenden. It flows briefly east towards New Rockford, then generally SSE through eastern North Dakota, past Jamestown, where it is first impounded by a large reservoir (the Jamestown Dam), and then joined by the Pipestem River. It enters northeastern South Dakota in Brown County, where it is impounded to form two reservoirs northeast of Aberdeen.

At Columbia, it is joined by the Elm River. Flowing southward across eastern South Dakota, it passes Huron and Mitchell, where it is joined by the Firesteel Creek. South of Mitchell, it flows southeast and joins the Missouri just east of Yankton.

The James River flows fully across the state of South Dakota, the only river other than the Missouri to do so.

Originally called "E-ta-zi-po-ka-se Wakpa," literally "unnavigable river", by the Dakota tribes, the river was named Rivière aux Jacques (literally, "James River" in English) by French explorers. By the time Dakota Territory was incorporated, it was being called the James River. Thomas L. Rosser, a former Confederate general who helped to build the Northern Pacific Railroad across North Dakota. A Virginian, he named the settlement of Jamestown, North Dakota, after the English colony of Jamestown, Virginia. However, the Dakota Territory Organic Act of 1861 renamed it the Dakota River. The new name failed to attain popular usage and the river retains its pre-1861 name.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1558 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 16, 2020 12:05 pm

Here are some views of chuck wagons.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1559 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 17, 2020 11:50 am

The Santa Rita Mountains, located about 40 mi southeast of Tucson, Arizona, extend 26 mi from north to south, then trending southeast. They merge again southeastwards into the Patagonia Mountains, trending northwest by southeast. The highest point in the range, and the highest point in the Tucson area, is Mount Wrightson, with an elevation of 9,453 feet, The range contains Madera Canyon, one of the world's premier birding areas. The Smithsonian Institution's Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory is located on Mount Hopkins. The range is one of the Madrean sky islands.

The Santa Rita Mountains are mostly within the Coronado National Forest. Prior to 1908 they were the principal component of Santa Rita National Forest, which was combined with other small forest tracts to form Coronado. Much of the range is protected by the Mount Wrightson Wilderness. The Santa Rita Mountains were severely burned in July 2005 in the Florida Fire.

A large porphyry copper deposit has been identified near the old Helvetia mining district on the north flank of the range. The proposed Rosemont mine would be an open pit operation located in the Santa Ritas about two miles west of mile marker 44 on Arizona State Route 83.

America's only known wild jaguar
The Santa Rita Mountains are the home range of "El Jefe," an adult male jaguar first identified in 2011.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1560 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 17, 2020 11:35 pm

Forgotten western movies: Ride Vaquero (1953)
After the Civil War, King Cameron moves to Texas, purchases a cattle ranch and settles down with his wife, Cordelia. They find themselves at the mercy of Jose Esqueda, a local bandit who has terrorized the town with his adoptive brother, Rio. Rio is kidnapped when he tries to mount an attack on the ranch and agrees to work for Cameron so he can be close to Cordelia. Though he's incensed at Rio's betrayal, Jose vows to get him back.

Robert Taylor ... Rio
Ava Gardner ... Cordelia Cameron
Howard Keel ... King Cameron
Anthony Quinn ... José Esqueda
Kurt Kasznar ... Father Antonio
Ted de Corsia ... Sheriff Parker
Charlita ... Singer
Jack Elam ... Barton
Walter Baldwin ... Adam Smith
Joe Dominguez ... Vincente
Frank McGrath ... Pete
Charles Stevens ... Vaquero
Rex Lease ... Deputy
Tom Greenway ... Deputy
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