Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

JUST TRIVIA

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OLDGUNNER
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JUST TRIVIA

#1 Post by OLDGUNNER » Sat May 26, 2018 7:03 pm

This article doesn’t mention the national championships after the state – maybe this was arranged after this article. I don’t have a good gun for this, but I‘ll be there – Heck, I am here. I just saw that Colt 3rd generation 1873’s going for 3, 4 and 5 thousand for new or as new...what in the world has happened with this? Just this afternoon I was at a garage sale and the guy said how about a dollar for 30 pounds of wax...I can make this into hard wax bullets for more than the rest of my life, and probable yours too.
http://www.cowboyfastdraw.com/images/st ... 202018.pdf

Actually I would want to modify the hammer on my 29 $ one and I don’t think that thIs is allowed....so I’ll just be watching.
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OLDGUNNER
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Re: JUST TRIVIA

#2 Post by OLDGUNNER » Tue May 29, 2018 2:42 am

https://www.nist.gov/news-events/news/2 ... omic-clock

I just saw this. It looks like this has been the most accurate for the last couple of years. We still don’t know how accurate it is for a time reading but it really doesn’t matter. It is just arbitrarily accepted as the time in the civilian sector, in the US. The navy wouldn’t use this...or at least didn’t in my time. it is just one of those things. With the Navy we used these Cesium clock standards mentioned but was told by a lady at the US Navy Observatory in Washington DC just what time to set our clocks at and in turn we would tell the Navy in the Pacific area around Guam what time it was. The Navy always wants to know what time it is. This same type of system was used in the Atlantic area as well, and this time was sent by a radio relay system. For years the navy has used the sun to tell time, for them, by looking at the sun’s zenith by telescope. The length of every day usually varies by some amount because the core of the earth is said to be molten and it slushes around and disturbs its rotation rate. We are just setting on a thin crust that has cooled down and hardened in four and a half billion years. And the Hawaiians are being reminded of this lately. Yes, every workday the lady at the observatory would have someone look at the sun at its point of passing over head, if there were no clouds and tell us, us meaning me for the two years that I was working in Guam. I was the only one that did this for the two years that I was there, just because it would be more error free and more accurate to have the same person do it all of the time...every workday it took me the first 15 minute to do this. The girl in the office would in turn send the time that I was reading to the lady at the observatory and she would know how well I was receiving her time. But she would not know how accurately that I was giving this time to the navy. I was reading it to the nearest 1/100 th of a micro second. This is a precision of 0.00000001 parts of a second. So she had a guy that would go around the world every six months or so and just stop in unannounced and check my standard clock of the system and just read it and go. He would be checking more than a dozen such labs. He would go back and the lady would determine the accuracy of my clock. And I remember that the most that I was ever off was 1.45 micro seconds. I would have no idea how close my clock would be. And this was well within the required accuracy of 40 milli seconds. This was just 15 minutes of my regular day. The time of radio transmission and reception was used for some navigation before the positioning satellites. Right after I got to Guam the boss and I didn’t know each other and he wanted to check me out so he told me to give him the distance from a spot in the lab to the transmitting antenna on the Tokyo Tower in Japan. It took me 15 minutes and I gave him my reading and he looked at his piece of paper and smiled....and said that that was close enough, and put it back in his pocket...it was 1800 and some miles and so many feet and inches. It was 15 inches different from what I had measured. And then later I had read that Guam was moving about 3 inches a year on the plate but it didn’t say in which direction.

Just to let you know what you may be setting your Timex by.
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Re: JUST TRIVIA

#3 Post by OLDGUNNER » Tue May 29, 2018 1:10 pm

th.jpg
th.jpg (8.41 KiB) Viewed 266 times
Here is what a Wasp-Waist air craft looks like. Following the 'area rule' design causes this 'Wasp-Waist' feature...but the Wasp-Waist bullet has no connection to the area rule concept. Yes, it may sound confusing.
One of them came before the other but I can't pin that part down. I have read that Wasp-Waist bullets are from the 30's and Germany played with the Wasp-Waist aircraft in the early 40's....???
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