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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2007 1:32 pm 
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Mil-Surp Owner
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Who has made one? What did you use? Any problems/comments/warnings?


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2007 2:55 pm 
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I did. A couple of D cells in a plastic box with some connectors and a switch. Works great!.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2007 10:42 pm 
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Very nice! Most of the ones Ive seen, as well as the one I plan on making, are just a flashlight and some wires.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 02, 2007 10:41 am 
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I took the easy way...
I used one of these

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 8:56 pm 
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I built one with the instructions from this website but made it simplier. Used a DC power charger from an old cell phone. Just the correct voltage. One lead on the rifle and the other on the 1/8 inch steel rod in the barrel. No sweat! Put electrical tape on the area where the rod would contact the barrel. Plugged the chamber with a rubber stopper found at Lowes. Drilled a hole in it for the rod so it would remain in the center.

Works great.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 3:52 am 
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Mil-Surp Shooter
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Gentlemen I have not heard of an electric bore cleaner please give details on type of cleaning it does, prep work, frequency of use etc. I may be older than a lot of you but I hope I am never to old to learn.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 8:43 am 
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You can use them as often as you wish. I use mine about every 4th or 5th cleaning. Here's a good article: http://www.surplusrifle.com/reviews/copperout/index.asp and here's s post from another board I frequent:

Quote:
SO! As promised many moons ago.... The Electric Bore Cleaner.

I tried to reduce the drawing I had made up into something that could be posted but it got too tiny to view so I'm going to assume that anybody reading this will have a general idea of a basic electric circuit with a line running out from the positive end of a battery and returning to the negative end. That is all this device really consists of. The power source is a single, "D" cell flashlight battery. I like the rechargable ones for obvious reasons. In this circuit, a wire is run from the positive lead of the battery, through a simple ON/OFF switch, and out to a 3Ft length of wire with an alligator clip attached. From the negative pole, a wire is run to another 3 Ft length of wire with yet another alligator clip attached. This time, between the negative pole and the clip, you're going to wire in a 0-100 Milliamp DC panel meter. I like to assemble all the components in a Radio Shack 'electronic project box'. They come in all sizes and make for a neat job. Radio Shack also sells the battery holders and 3 ft test leads with alligator clips already attached. With the exception of the Panel Meter, you can probably pick up almost everything you need for the job at Radio Shack.

The next item you'll need is a 1/8 or 3/16" diameter piece of spring stock, about 3 ft in length. Usually hobby shops have this. Any kind of steel rod will do provided it doesn't have alot of flex in it. On one end of this rod, you're going to shrink into place a length of the heat-shrink wire wrap cover -again available from Radio Shack. Harbor Freight has them as well. The ideal here is to cover about 3" of the end of the rod, including the butt end. No rod exposed on that end. Over the other end of the rod you're going to slip another length of the heat-shrink but you're not going to shrink into place. This piece of tubing will be slid up and down the rod as needed for different barrel lengths. The shrink wraps, both fixed and sliding, will keep the steel rod from grounding to the barrel. It's this rod that will recieve all the copper from your barrel so polish it up well, removing any scale and oil before you get to working on it. You're almost done.

Lastly, you need some Parson's Brand Non Sudsing household ammonia. It's blue in color. Why Parsons? Dunno! The guy who designed this unit said to use it, and it only. They sell it nation-wide. Maybe it's not important. Just don't use "sudsing" ammonia.

To Use the Unit:

Clean the powder residue from your barrel. With the bolt removed, insert an appropriately sized cork into the chamber. Prop the gun with the muzzle up. Using a 10CC syringe or a small funnel pour the ammonia into the bore, leaving enough space to insert the electrode (steel rod) without overflowing. Ammonia will dull a glossy finish on a gunstock poste haste so, if it's deluxe wood, remove the barreled action. Otherwise, tie an old T-shirt around the barrel below the muzzle to catch overflow. The Ammonia will not harm the gun's blueing. No guarantees on nickle, though.

With the rod in the barrel (shrink wrapped end towards the chamber) , and the ammonia filled up to the top attach the positive lead of the unit to any metal part that is in circuit with the barrel: the trigger guard, rear sight, reciever ring...what ever. The negative end will attach to the exposed metal end of the rod. The sliding tube will lay between the rod and the barrel preventing the rod from shorting out to the barrel proper.

Flip the switch. The meter should have a brief (1-5 second) spike, then start drifting downward. It will settle out at some point. If the meter stays spiked, check to see that the exposed metal of the rod isn't touching the barrel. Don't freak out. There isn't an arc of electricity carving into your barrel. Just reposition the rod until the needle starts downward. After a few minutes you'll see the meter needle drop quite a bit. Turn off the unit, remove the rod, and wipe off the balck gunk that has accumulated on the rod. It's powder residue and other junk carried over by the current. When you wipe the rod you may already see traces of copper. Reinsert the rod, top off the ammonia, and start it up again. The meter will climb up past it's previous low point. Now you can leave it alone unless you're cleaning an ancient Lee Enfield or such with 80 years of copper fouling! About 20 minutes should see a normal rifle cleaned. There will always be a few milli-amps of current passing through the solution so when the meter reads below 10MA I usually figure it's done. When done, remove the rod, pour out the ammonia. (It will be a crazy blue color) Remove the cork. Run a patch of H20 through the bore, then patch it dry. A light patch with a drop of oil follows. Done.

Safety: The fellow who designed this rig put it into print in a shooting journal some 20 years ago. The next issue, the Editor (an Ex RCBS employee) stated that he'd "heard" that this unit would etch barrels and the electricity could arc inside the barrel, and that possibly, the very iron could be sucked from the steel itself. The designer posted a retraction of the article, claiming that RCBS had threatened him with a lawsuit over what they deemed "patent infringments" on their electric bore cleaner. Well, I smelled a rat. I was in college at the time and our school had a very good chemistry lab. Long story short, with the help of the head of the Chem dept., I ran an experiment on a section of barrel where by I induced current for 120 continous hours. Every day the section of barrel was examined for surface irregularities and weighed to the 10,000 of a gram. No change in weight showed nothing being "stripped" from the steel. There was no change in surface finish. I have used this device for 20 years now on $30 junkers and $5000 collector's guns with no worries. As some of you know, I am a cast bullet junkie. Before this device I would run through quarts of "Sweets 7.62" to remove the copper fouling from each new treasure that crossed my bench. As all cast bullet shooters should know, copper fouling causes inaccuracy and leading. This "de-plating machine" has been a godsend.

By today's standards, this unit costs about $30 to assemble. Built to the specifications I outlined, it should be safe when used as described. If you change anything you're on your own. If you choose to build this unit, you do so at your own risk. Don't you hate having to read that?

Good Luck. ~AMMOe

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 9:28 am 
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Mil-Surp Owner
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I use a car battery charger but don't run it more than 15 minutes at a time. On it's lowest setting.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 12:30 pm 
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Great info guys thanks a lot

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 12:13 pm 
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The search engine seems to be working again. Try searching for EBC in the Metal Care and Cleaning section. Lots of topics, there will be more hits if you search the entire forum as well.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:03 pm 
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Glad this subject came up.
I am in the middle of an EBC project. I have an 1/8" stainless steel rod with short sections of plastic tubing to prevent contact with the barrel. I would like to use a toy train transformer as a power source. What do think?

Scotty


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:09 pm 
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Make sure it puts out DC and that you know which is the positive lead.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 8:11 am 
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Scotty139 wrote:
Glad this subject came up.
I am in the middle of an EBC project. I have an 1/8" stainless steel rod with short sections of plastic tubing to prevent contact with the barrel. I would like to use a toy train transformer as a power source. What do think?

Scotty


There were a few cautions if I recall correctly on how much power actually was used, some adverse effects were seen with using a power source that had too much juice, I don't remember if it was amps or volts, but you might want to study a bit.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 10:13 am 
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Yes, I agree with Ed. Too much power. An old cell phone charger is a far better choice - and make sure you know which is positive and which negative, otherwise you plate gunk onto your bore not off of it. I wouldn't use more than about 3 Volts. Circuits draw current based on their voltage so it really doesn't matter how much current your power supply is capable of delivering, only how many volts. 100 mA is ample for an EBC at 3 Volts - less is usable, but you should avoid more.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 3:33 pm 
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Instead of tape or shrink tubing on the spring rod, I found some little O rings at Lowes, that worked pretty well. They just slip off of the rod and make it easier for me to clean it.


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