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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1111 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 23, 2019 10:11 am

More Oscar Crockett spurs.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1112 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 23, 2019 3:33 pm

Great western character actors:
A rather wanderlust fellow before he latched onto acting, Denver Pyle--who made a career of playing drawling, somewhat slow Southern types--was actually born in Colorado in 1920, to a farming family. He attended a university for a time but dropped out to become a drummer. When that didn't pan out he drifted from job to job, doing everything from working the oil fields in Oklahoma to the shrimp boats in Texas. In 1940 he moseyed off to Los Angeles and briefly found employment as a NBC page. That particular career was interrupted by World War II, and Pyle enlisted in the navy. Wounded in the battle of Guadalcanal, he received a medical discharge in 1943. Working for an aircraft plant in Los Angeles as a riveter, the rangy actor was introduced to the entertainment field after receiving a role in an amateur theater production and getting spotted by a talent scout. Training with such renowned teachers as Maria Ouspenskaya and Michael Chekhov, he made his film debut in The Guilt of Janet Ames (1947). Pyle went on to roles in hundreds of film and TV parts, bringing a touch of Western authenticity to many of his roles. A minor villain or sidekick in the early 1950s, he often received no billing. Prematurely white-haired (a family trait), he became a familiar face on episodes of Gunsmoke (1955) and Bonanza (1959) and also developed a close association with actor John Wayne, appearing in many of Wayne's later films, including The Horse Soldiers (1959), The Alamo (1960), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) and Cahill U.S. Marshal (1973). Pyle's more important movie roles came late in his career. One of his most memorable was in Bonnie and Clyde (1967) as Texas Ranger Frank Hamer, the handcuffed hostage of the duo, who spits in Bonnie's (Faye Dunaway) face after she coyly poses with him for a camera shot. He settled easily into hillbilly/mountain men types in his later years and became a household face for his crotchety presence in The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams (1977) and, especially, The Dukes of Hazzard (1979). He died of lung cancer at age 77.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1113 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 24, 2019 11:45 am

The Sawtooth Range is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in central Idaho, United States, reaching a maximum elevation of 10,751 feet at the summit of Thompson Peak. It encompass an area of 678 square miles spanning parts of Custer, Boise, Blaine, and Elmore counties, and is bordered to the east by the Sawtooth Valley. Much of the mountain range is within the Sawtooth Wilderness, part of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area and Sawtooth National Forest.
The mountains were named for their jagged peaks.

There are 57 peaks with an elevation over 10,000 feet in the Sawtooth Range, all falling between 10,000 to 10,751 feet on Thompson Peak, the highest point in the range. Another 77 peaks fall between 9,000 and 10,000 feet.

Climbs range in difficulty between the 9,150-foot Observation Peak, a Class 1 hike, and 8,980-foot King Spire, a rock route rated Class 5.10 on the Yosemite Decimal System.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1114 Post by nrobertb » Wed Apr 24, 2019 7:46 pm

The Colorado River is one of the principal rivers (along with the Rio Grande) in the Southwestern United States and northern Mexico. The 1,450-mile-long river drains an expansive, arid watershed that encompasses parts of seven U.S. and two Mexican states. Starting in the central Rocky Mountains of Colorado, the river flows generally southwest across the Colorado Plateau and through the Grand Canyon before reaching Lake Mead on the Arizona–Nevada border, where it turns south toward the international border. After entering Mexico, the Colorado approaches the mostly dry Colorado River Delta at the tip of the Gulf of California between Baja California and Sonora.

Known for its dramatic canyons, whitewater rapids, and eleven U.S. National Parks, the Colorado River and its tributaries are a vital source of water for 40 million people. The river and its tributaries are controlled by an extensive system of dams, reservoirs, and aqueducts, which in most years divert its entire flow for agricultural irrigation and domestic water supply. Its large flow and steep gradient are used for generating hydroelectric power, and its major dams regulate peaking power demands in much of the Intermountain West. Intensive water consumption has dried up the lower 100 miles of the river, which has rarely reached the sea since the 1960s.

Beginning with small bands of nomadic hunter-gatherers, Native Americans have inhabited the Colorado River basin for at least 8,000 years. Between 2,000 and 1,000 years ago, the watershed was home to large agricultural civilizations – considered some of the most sophisticated indigenous North American cultures – which eventually declined due to a combination of severe drought and poor land use practices. Most native peoples that inhabit the region today are descended from other groups that settled there beginning about 1,000 years ago. Europeans first entered the Colorado Basin in the 16th century, when explorers from Spain began mapping and claiming the area, which became part of Mexico upon its independence in 1821. Early contact between Europeans and Native Americans was generally limited to the fur trade in the headwaters and sporadic trade interactions along the lower river.

After most of the Colorado River basin became part of the U.S. in 1846, much of the river's course was still the subject of myths and speculation. Several expeditions charted the Colorado in the mid-19th century – one of which, led by John Wesley Powell, was the first to run the rapids of the Grand Canyon. American explorers collected valuable information that was later used to develop the river for navigation and water supply. Large-scale settlement of the lower basin began in the mid- to late-19th century, with steamboats providing transportation from the Gulf of California to landings along the river that linked to wagon roads to the interior. Starting in the 1860s, gold and silver strikes drew prospectors to parts of the upper Colorado River basin.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1115 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 25, 2019 9:22 am

A pair of spurs by Edward Bohlin.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1116 Post by nrobertb » Thu Apr 25, 2019 5:48 pm

Parker Dam spans the Colorado River between Arizona and California, 155 miles downstream from Hoover Dam. Built between 1934 and 1938 by the Bureau of Reclamation, Parker Dam is operated with Hoover and Davis Dams to bring water and power benefits to residents of the lower Colorado River Basin.

Parker Dam's primary purpose is to provide reservoir storage for water to be pumped into the Colorado River and Central Arizona Project Aqueducts. Lake Havasu, the reservoir behind Parker Dam, is about 45 miles long and can store nearly 211 billion gallons of water.

Lake Havasu provides clear, desilted water for the Colorado River Aqueduct and serves the Central Arizona Project. Parker Dam was constructed with funds advanced by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Since 1941, the Colorado River Aqueduct has delivered water from Lake Havasu behind Parker Dam to the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The Colorado River Aqueduct is also tapped by the San Diego Aqueduct, which takes water to that city's water system as well.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1117 Post by nrobertb » Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:10 pm

Davis Dam is a dam on the Colorado River about 70 miles downstream from Hoover Dam. It stretches across the border between Arizona and Nevada. Originally called Bullhead Dam, Davis Dam was renamed after Arthur Powell Davis, who was the director of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation from 1914 to 1923. The United States Bureau of Reclamation owns and operates the dam, which was completed in 1951.

Davis Dam impounds the Colorado River and forms Lake Mohave.
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Davis Dam is a zoned earth-fill dam with a concrete spillway, 1,600 ft in length at the crest, and 200 ft high. The earth fill dam begins on the Nevada side, but it does not extend to the Arizona side on the east. Instead, there is an inlet formed by earth and concrete, that includes the spillway. The hydroelectric power plant is beside the inlet.

The dam's purpose is to re-regulate releases from Hoover Dam upstream, and facilitate the delivery of Colorado River water to Mexico. Bullhead City, Arizona, and Laughlin, Nevada, are located just below the dam along the river. Davis Camp is also nearby. Bullhead City was originally a construction town for workers building the dam.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1118 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 27, 2019 9:49 am

The City of Central, commonly known as Central City, is the Home Rule Municipality in Gilpin and Clear Creek counties that is the county seat and the most populous municipality of Gilpin County, Colorado. The city is a historic mining settlement founded in 1859 during the Pike's Peak Gold Rush and came to be known as the "Richest Square Mile on Earth". Central City and the adjacent city of Black Hawk form the federally designated Central City/Black Hawk Historic District. The city is now a part of the Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area.

On May 6, 1859, during the Pike's Peak Gold Rush, John H. Gregory found a gold-bearing vein in Gregory Gulch between Black Hawk and Central City. Within two months many other veins were discovered. By 1860, as many as 10,000 prospectors had flocked to the town, then known as Mountain City, and surrounding prospects, but most soon left, many returning east. The 1900 census showed 3,114 people.

The year 1863 brought the first attempt by hard rock miners to form a hard rock miners' union. Of 125 miners signing a union resolution in Central City, about fifty broke windows and doors at the Bob Tail mine, forcing other workers out. After a night of shooting and fighting, the union effort among Central City miners failed.

Many Chinese lived in Central City during the early days working the placer deposits of Gregory Gulch. They were forbidden work in the underground mines. Most of them are believed to have returned to China after making their stake.

The frontier gambler Poker Alice lived for a time in Central City and several other Colorado mining communities.

Gold mining in the Central City district decreased rapidly between 1900 and 1920, as the veins were exhausted. Mining revived in the early 1930s in response to the increase in the price of gold from $20 to $35 per ounce, but then virtually shut down during World War II when gold mining was declared nonessential to the war effort.

The population of Central City and its sister city Black Hawk fell to a few hundred by the 1950s. Casino gambling was introduced in both towns in the early 1990s, but had more success in Black Hawk (which has 18 casinos) than in Central City (which has 6 casinos), partly because the main road to Central City passed through Black Hawk, tempting gamblers to stop in Black Hawk instead.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1119 Post by nrobertb » Sat Apr 27, 2019 10:40 am

Great western character actors: Bud Osborne's almost 50-year career in films began--as far as is known--in 1912 with, naturally, a western. Originally from Texas, Osborne worked for "Wild West" shows where he was noted for his astonishing prowess in handling six-horse wagons and stagecoaches, a talent that carried over into films. He began as a stuntman but the fact that he not only looked like a cowboy but actually was one meant that he was soon playing cowboys in front of the camera, in addition to his stunting and horse-handling chores. His stocky, somewhat rugged appearance and Texas accent carried him easily through the transition to talkies, and he soon became one of the busiest supporting players in westerns of the 1930s and 1940s (altogether he appeared in more than 550 films, in addition to much television work, almost all of it in westerns). Age began catching up with him in the 1950s, and he wound out his career appearing in several of director Edward D. Wood Jr.'s micro-budget horror and sci-fi extravaganzas.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1120 Post by nrobertb » Sun Apr 28, 2019 12:08 am

"Poker" Alice Ivers was born in England, to Irish immigrants. Her family moved to Virginia when Alice was twelve. As a young woman, she went to boarding school in Virginia to become a refined lady. While in her late teens, her family moved to Leadville, a city in the then Colorado Territory.

It was in Leadville that Alice met Frank Duffield, whom she married at a young age. Frank Duffield was a mining engineer who played poker in his spare time. After just a few years of marriage, Duffield was killed in an accident while resetting a dynamite charge in a Leadville mine.

Ivers was known for splurging her winnings, as when she won a lot of money in Silver City and spent it all in New York. After all of her big wins, she would travel to New York and spend her money on clothes. She was very keen on keeping up with the latest fashions and would buy dresses to wear to play poker, partly as a business investment to distract her opponents.

Alice met her next husband around 1890 when she was a dealer in Bedrock Tom's saloon in Deadwood, South Dakota. When a drunken miner tried to attack her fellow dealer Warren G. Tubbs with a knife, Alice threatened him with her .38. After this incident, Tubbs and Ivers started a romance and were married soon after.

Alice Ivers and Warren Tubbs had four sons and three daughters together. Tubbs and Ivers did not want their children to be influenced by the world of poker, so they moved to a house just northeast of Sturgis on the Moreau River in South Dakota. Tubbs was not only a dealer, but a housepainter as well. It was most likely this house painting that caused him to fall sick with tuberculosis. Warren Tubbs died in 1910 of pneumonia during a blizzard. Alice drove her husband's body in a wagon 50 miles to get him a decent burial. To pay for his funeral, she had to pawn her wedding ring, which led her back to the poker tables.

Alice's third husband was George Huckert, who worked on her homestead taking care of the sheep. Huckert was constantly proposing to Ivers, yet for a while she did not agree. Eventually, however, Ivers owed Huckert $1,008, so she married him figuring that it would be cheaper than paying his back wages. Huckert died in 1913.

After the death of her first husband, Alice started to play poker seriously. Alice was in a tough financial position. After failing in a few different jobs including teaching, she turned to poker to support herself financially. Alice would make money by gambling and working as a dealer. Ivers made a name for herself by winning money from poker games. By the time Ivers was given the name "Poker Alice," she was drawing in large crowds to watch her play and men were constantly challenging her to play. Saloon owners liked that Ivers was a respectable woman who kept to her values. These values included her refusal to play poker on Sundays.

As her reputation grew, so did the amount of money she was making. Some nights she would even make $6,000, an incredibly large sum of money at the time. Alice claimed that she won $250,000, which would now be worth more than three million dollars.

Ivers used her good looks to distract men at the poker table. She always had the newest dresses, and even in her 50s was considered a very attractive woman. She was also very good at counting cards and figuring odds, which helped her at the table.

Alice was known always to have carried a gun with her, preferably her .38, and frequently smoked cigars.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1121 Post by nrobertb » Sun Apr 28, 2019 11:08 am

Back in the late 1960's, when I was working at Carlsbad Caverns National Park, visitors who entered the natural entrance were on tours with uniformed guides.
A short way in, the front guide would unlock a steel gate, and the rear guide would lock it again after everyone had passed through. When the tour reached the underground lunchroom, visitors were free to wander through the Big Room at their own pace, then exit by elevator.

One morning on the first tour of the day, the lead guide was surprised to find the gate standing open and a broken padlock on the floor. It appeared that someone the previous day had hidden until the cave closed for the night, then did a bit of exploring and finally climbed back up to the entrance and broke out.

We never did find out who or why.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1122 Post by nrobertb » Sun Apr 28, 2019 5:32 pm

Very little is known about Elsa Jane Guerin's early life. In her memoir, she writes that she was married at twelve, and, at fifteen, she had two children. Her husband was shot by a member of his riverboat crew and Guerin left her children with the Sisters of Mercy, and dressed as a man to find work. She would dress as a woman once a month to meet her children, and otherwise worked as a cabin attendant on a steamer along the St. Louis-New Orleans route. In the 1850s she travelled to Sacramento Valley to find her husbands killer. She tried mining for gold but wrote that her strength was "not sufficient for the business" of prospecting. She opened a saloon, eventually buying a ranch called Shasta. Guerin would also work as a cabin boy, an Illinois Central Railroad brakeman, and a trader for the American Fur Company. Two years later, Guerin was in Colorado, running a bar and bakery, with the saloon being called the Mountain Boy’s Saloon. While there, she found her husbands murderer, and engaged in a shootout with him, during which they were both wounded.Around the same time, she married her barkeeper, H. L. Guerin. Guerin said of her time: I began to rather like the freedom of my new character. I could go where I chose, do many things, which while innocent in themselves, were debarred by propriety from association with the female sex. The change from the cumbersome, unhealthy attire of women to the more convenient, healthy habiliments of a man, was in itself almost sufficient to compensate for its unwomanly character.

The following year, Guerin moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where she would write her autobiography, Mountain Charley: Or, The adventures of Mrs. E. J. Guerin, who was thirteen years in male attire; an autobiography comprising a period of thirteen years life in the States, California, and Pike's Peak. Subsequently, she enlisted and served in the Civil War, where she spied dressed in women's clothing, and eventually became first lieutenant.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1123 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 29, 2019 10:01 am

Great western character actors: Tall and rangy, usually sporting long mangy hair, and frequently projecting a strong and intense on-screen presence, character actor Luke Askew made a potent and lasting impression playing a substantial volume of mean and fearsome villains in both motion pictures and television shows alike in a career that spanned over forty years. Askew was born on March 26, 1932 in Macon, Georgia. He was of mixed Yorksire and Scandinavian descent and first developed an interest in acting towards the end of high school. Luke attended the University of Georgia (where he initially planned on getting a B.A. in Business Administration), Mercer University, and the Walter F. George School of Law. Luke served in the U.S. Air Force in strategic air command intelligence during his college years. Following college Askew worked as a radio deejay and television announcer prior to beginning his acting career in Off-Broadway stage productions in New York City (Askew lived in Greenwich Village in the early 1960s and kept himself afloat working as a furniture mover). Luke moved to Los Angeles in 1966 and made his film debut in 1967 in "Harry Sundown." Best known as the stranger on the highway in the hippie counterculture cult classic "Easy Rider," Askew's other memorable roles include the redoubtable Boss Paul in "Cool Hand Luke," peaceful hippie commune leader Jonathan Tremaine in "Angel Unchained;" very scary and hateful as brutal low-life thug Automatic Slim in the grim revenge thriller "Rolling Thunder," sleazy coroner Dexter Ward in "The Beast Within," and no-nonsense Irish gypsy crime lord Boss Jack Costello in "Traveller." Moreover, Luke appeared in a sizable number of Westerns made throughout the 1960s and 1970s: He had a rare lead role in the spaghetti Western "Night of the Serpent" and gave an especially fine performance as tough and stoic veteran cowpoke Luke in the gritty gem "The Culpepper Cattle Co." Among the many TV series Askew popped up in throughout the years are "The High Chaparral," "Mission: Impossible," "Cannon," "The Six Million Dollar Man," "Fantasy Island," "T.J. Hooker," "The Fall Guy," "Airwolf," "Murder, She Wrote," "Walker, Texas Ranger," "Everwood," and "Cold Case." Luke had an excellent recurring part as creepy and dangerous polygamist Hollis Greene on the acclaimed cable TV program "Big Love." Askew died at age 80 at his home in Portland, Oregon on March 29, 2012
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1124 Post by nrobertb » Mon Apr 29, 2019 1:30 pm

Spurs by Bruce Cheaney of Gainesville, TX.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1125 Post by nrobertb » Tue Apr 30, 2019 12:17 pm

A custom Wade saddle by Bob Beecher.
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