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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1261 Post by nrobertb » Mon Aug 26, 2019 2:02 pm

Another image of Pistol Pete. The other guy must be some sort of lawman, but he looks more like a bus driver.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1262 Post by nrobertb » Tue Aug 27, 2019 10:16 am

Back in 1963 I was in the Tenth Infantry at Ft. Carson. CO. One day the company arms room posted a notice that on a certain day and time they would sell all their leftover Springfields for $10 apiece. At the appointed time I got in line outside the arms room along with a lot of eager soldiers. Unfortunately, before I got to the head of the line they had all been sold.

About that time the NRA started selling Springfields through the CMP. I sent in my $14.50 and soon was the proud owner of a brand new Smith-Corona, so all was well.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1263 Post by LCPfraTN » Tue Aug 27, 2019 3:48 pm

nrobertb wrote:Back in 1963 I was in the Tenth Infantry at Ft. Carson. CO. One day the company arms room posted a notice that on a certain day and time they would sell all their leftover Springfields for $10 apiece. At the appointed time I got in line outside the arms room along with a lot of eager soldiers. Unfortunately, before I got to the head of the line they had all been sold.

About that time the NRA started selling Springfields through the CMP. I sent in my $14.50 and soon was the proud owner of a brand new Smith-Corona, so all was well.
I’d say you definitely got your money’s worth!


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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1264 Post by nrobertb » Wed Aug 28, 2019 9:56 am

Great western character actors: Richard Xavier Slattery (June 26, 1925 – January 27, 1997) was an American character actor in film, theater and television. Slattery appeared in such films as A Distant Trumpet, The Boston Strangler, Walking Tall, The No Mercy Man and Herbie Rides Again.

Born in New York, Slattery was a graduate of All Hallows High School who briefly studied at Fordham University, where he had scholarships in track and football. He left Fordham and enlisted in the U.S. Air Force, where he served as a lieutenant in the Pacific for two and a half years.

Slattery was distinguished by a square-jawed look and a rough, gravelly voice that made him ideal as a "tough guy" character, usually as a cowboy or a cop or a drill sergeant type. He had been an NYPD police officer for 12 years (1948–1960) and started his acting career in police academy training films, and in community theater in the Bronx.

He has had numerous guest appearance roles in television, including Route 66, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, 77 Sunset Strip, Gunsmoke, Rawhide, The Andy Griffith Show, Bewitched, The Invaders, F Troop, The Green Hornet, The Virginian, Bonanza, The Partridge Family, The Mod Squad, Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, Emergency!, Run, Joe, Run, The Waltons, Ironside, Kojak, The San Pedro Beach Bums, and Knight Rider

For 14 years, Slattery was featured in many TV commercials for Unocal 76 gasoline, playing a grandfatherly service station owner named Murph. He played Lieutenant Modeen in Switch and had featured roles in three series: The Gallant Men (as 1st Sgt. John McKenna): Mister Roberts (as Captain John Morton), and C.P.O. Sharkey (as Captain "Buck" Buckner).
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1265 Post by nrobertb » Thu Aug 29, 2019 3:07 pm

some spurs by August Buermann.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1266 Post by nrobertb » Fri Aug 30, 2019 5:59 am

A knife with koa wood handle by Jason Knight.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1267 Post by nrobertb » Sat Aug 31, 2019 10:34 am

Great western character actors: American character actor Frank Ferguson appeared in scores of films and television shows, often as self-important types. Prior to his film debut, he was a prominent performer and director with the acclaimed Pasadena Community Playhouse, where he coached numerous up-and-coming young actors such as Dana Andrews, George Reeves, Robert Preston and Victor Mature. He broke into films, himself, in the early 1940s, usually playing minor supporting roles, though he was seen to advantage in larger roles, notably in two of the best-known (and oddest) westerns of the '50s, Rancho Notorious (1952) and Johnny Guitar (1954). He played hundreds of ranchers, bankers and police detectives in films and television throughout the '50s and '60s. He became most familiar as "Gus" on the children's program My Friend Flicka (1955) and later as "Eli Carson" on the two TV series based on the novel Peyton Place (1964). He semi-retired in 1972 and died of cancer six years later.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1268 Post by nrobertb » Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:56 am

A knife from John Cohen.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1269 Post by nrobertb » Mon Sep 02, 2019 9:49 am

I'll be heading for this area at the end of the week.
The Conejos River is a tributary of the Rio Grande, approximately 92.5 miles long, in south-central Colorado. It drains a scenic area of the eastern San Juan Mountains west of the San Luis Valley.

It rises from snowmelt along the continental divide west of Conejos Peak in western Conejos County, approximately 15 miles northeast of Pagosa Springs. It flows briefly northeast, through Platoro Reservoir, then southeast through the Rio Grande National Forest, then east along the New Mexico border through a scenic canyon. It enters the southwestern corner of the San Luis Valley from the west near Conejos and joins the Rio Grande from the west approximately 15 mi southeast of Alamosa.

The river is wide and shallow along much of its course. It descends steeply in several areas, including at Pinnacle Canyon, a popular destination for whitewater rafting.

Off limits to white settlement during the New Spain years, the river was the site of early land grants to settlers from the government of Mexico in the 1830s. The first settlement of 50 families along the river, in the Guadalupe Grant in 1833, was destroyed in an attack by Native Americans. José Jacques established the first white settlement on the river in 1851. The town of Conejos was founded in the 1854 by Lafayette Head, who later became the first lieutenant governor of Colorado.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1270 Post by nrobertb » Mon Sep 02, 2019 9:49 pm

The fall annual sheep and goat roundup near Antonito, Colorado. The smoke is from the Cumbres and Toltec Railroad, which I think I've mentioned before.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1271 Post by nrobertb » Tue Sep 03, 2019 11:41 am

Tarryall Creek is a tributary of the South Platte River, approximately 68.5 miles long, in Park County in central Colorado in the United States. It drains a rural portion of north and central South Park, an intermontane grassland in the Rocky Mountains southwest of Denver. It rises in the high Rockies in several forks along the Continental Divide in the Pike National Forest southwest of Boreas Pass. It descends to the southwest through a short canyon, emerging into South Park near Como, Colorado. It crosses U.S. Highway 285 east of Red Hill Pass northeast of Fairplay, the county seat of Park County, then meanders towards the southeast, joining the South Platte from the east in the southeastern corner of South Park.

The creek was one of the most active locations for the prospecting of gold during the Colorado Gold Rush in 1859. The "Tarryall diggings" and other nearby sites on the west side of South Park attracted thousands of prospectors over Ute Pass and Kenosha Pass, and the towns of Tarryall and Hamilton, both now completely vanished, were soon founded along the creek. There are no towns on the upper creek today.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1272 Post by nrobertb » Wed Sep 04, 2019 7:35 pm

I'll be back from Colorado in two weeks. I'll see you all then.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1273 Post by nrobertb » Sat Sep 21, 2019 12:06 am

Traveling across the country on the interstate highways reminds you how much of the nation''s goods travel by long haul truck.

Peterbilt Motors Company, founded in 1939, is an American manufacturer of medium- and heavy-duty trucks. A subsidiary of Paccar, which also owns fellow heavy-duty truck manufacturer Kenworth. Peterbilt Motors is headquartered in Denton, Texas and operates manufacturing facilities in Denton, Texas and Sainte-Thérèse, Quebec.

From 1939 until the mid-1980s, the company was based in the East Bay area of Northern California. The original plant was in Oakland, which closed in 1960 and moved to nearby Newark. Truck production moved to Denton, Texas at the close of 1986, but division headquarters and engineering remained in California until 1992, when a new administrative complex and engineering department at the Denton plant was completed. The Madison/Nashville plant opened in 1969 in Madison, Tennessee, for the east coast market. Originally it only manufactured the 352/282 cabover, then conventional production began in the 1970s until it was closed in 2009. Production of Class 8 trucks continues at the Denton, Texas plant.

In the first third of the 20th century, logs for the lumber industry were floated downriver, hauled with steam tractors or horse teams. Tacoma, Washington plywood manufacturer and lumberman T.A. Peterman could not get his felled inventory to his lumber mill quickly or efficiently enough to suit his needs, so he looked at the then-nascent automobile technology for logging trucks that could do the job.

Peterman began by rebuilding surplus military trucks, improving the technology with each successive vehicle, such as replacing crank starters with battery powered ones. In 1938, near the end of the Great Depression, he purchased the assets of Fageol Motors of Oakland, California, which had gone into receivership in 1932 (near the depths of the Depression). With the ability to turn out custom built chassis Peterman initially produced two chain-drive logging trucks, which proved unsuccessful. In 1939, he began selling his trucks to the public.

T. A. Peterman died in 1944. His wife, Ida, sold the company to seven individuals within the organization, but retained its land. They then expanded it into a major producer of heavy-duty trucks. In 1958, Ida Peterman announced plans to sell the property to develop a shopping center. The shareholders, not wanting to invest in a new manufacturing facility, sold the company in June 1958 to Pacific Car & Foundry Co., then primarily a manufacturer of railroad freight cars, which had acquired the assets of heavy truck competitor Kenworth in 1944. One year later, Pacific Car and Foundry started construction of a modern 176,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Newark, Calif. In August, 1960 Peterbilt moved to the new facility and became a division of the parent firm. Pacific Car and Foundry Co. changed its name officially to Paccar in 1972.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1274 Post by nrobertb » Sat Sep 21, 2019 10:49 am

Great western character actors: Kevin Hagen (April 3, 1928 – July 9, 2005) was an American actor best known for his role as Dr. Hiram Baker on NBC's Little House on the Prairie.

Hagen was born in Chicago, Illinois, to professional ballroom dancers. When his father deserted his family, young Hagen was reared by his mother, grandmother, and aunts. As a 15-year-old, he relocated to Portland, Oregon, where one of his aunts had taken a teaching job. His family returned to Chicago, and he attended Oregon State University in Corvallis and later the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California, from which he received a degree in international relations. He spent a year in law school at the University of California, Los Angeles, and was subsequently employed by the U.S. State Department in West Germany, followed by a two-year stint in the United States Navy. For a time, he taught ballroom dancing, the specialty of his parents, for the Arthur Murray Company. Then, at the age of 27, he tried acting. He was spotted in a production of Eugene O'Neill's Desire Under the Elms and given a guest-starring role on the classic 1950s police series Dragnet, starring Jack Webb.

Hagen began to work steadily in television and film. His first regular role on a series was in 1958 in the CBS Western Yancy Derringer, starring Jock Mahoney in the title role. Hagen played John Colton, the city administrator of New Orleans, around 1868. At the beginning of each episode, Colton asks Derringer to halt some threat facing the city; at the end of each segment, he arrests Derringer for breaking the law to solve the crisis.

On April 29, 1962, Hagen was cast as the lead guest star in another Western series, in the episode "Cort" of Lawman with John Russell and Peter Brown.

Hagen guest-starred seven times on Gunsmoke, six times on The Big Valley, five times each on Bonanza, Laramie, and Have Gun - Will Travel, four appearances on Mannix and The Time Tunnel, and three appearances on Perry Mason, the first in 1958 in "The Case of the Sardonic Sargeant", and two of them in 1965, as murderer Jacob Leonard in "The Case of the Gambling Lady" and Samuel Carleton in "The Case of the Fugitive Fraulein". He also appeared as the ever-threatening Inspector Dobbs Kobick in nine episodes of Land of the Giants from 1968-70.

Other appearances included Bat Masterson, Riverboat, Wagon Train, Outlaws, Straightaway, GE True, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Twilight Zone, in the episodes "Elegy", and "You Drive", Daniel Boone, Blue Light, Mission: Impossible, Rawhide, 77 Sunset Strip, M*A*S*H, The Rifleman, Lancer, The Virginian, The Guns of Will Sonnett, The Cowboys, Lost in Space (as the alien in the episode "His Majesty Smith"), The Silent Force, Sara, Quincy, M.E., Simon and Simon, and Knots Landing.

Hagen considered his big break to be the role of a Confederate renegade who kills James Stewart's son and daughter-in-law in the 1965 film Shenandoah. His most famous role was one of his most pleasant, as kindly Doc Baker on Michael Landon's Little House on the Prairie. He played the part of Doc Baker from 1974 to 1983, as well as in a one-man show, A Playful Dose of Prairie Wisdom.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1275 Post by nrobertb » Sun Sep 22, 2019 11:04 am

Next time you go to a fast food joint and instead of a lawn they have red cinders, think of the volcanic cinder cones out west where the stuff was mined.

One such is the Aiken Cinder Mine in the Mojave National Preserve. It began operations in 1948, mining cinder cone (volcanic rock). The abandoned mine has been closed since 1990, when they essentially just left everything behind. Most of the mining equipment (what hasn’t been pieced off by vandalism) is still around: tractors, diesel engines, massive conveyor belts, shakers, weigh stations, scales, etc. Definitely a cool area to explore. Just off the main mine area is a small volcanic arch, next to the ruins of an old stone house.
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