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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1306 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 19, 2019 7:45 pm

My wife and I riding in Colorado's San Juan Mtns.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1307 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:38 pm

A 1950's saddle from Hamley's of Pendleton, OR.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1308 Post by nrobertb » Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:06 pm

A 1930's saddle by N. Porter of Phoenix, AZ.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1309 Post by nrobertb » Mon Oct 21, 2019 1:22 pm

World Bird Sanctuary is both a unique St. Louis attraction and entertaining environmental education opportunity. With over 305 acres and over 200 animals in their care, it offers a one-of-a-kind wildlife experience. World Bird Sanctuary’s mission is to preserve, protect and inspire to safeguard bird species as part of the global community for future generations. Their vision is to create a world where diverse bird species are secure and thriving in a variety of stable ecological communities. They work to fulfill this mission through our six core competencies of sanctuary services, education, rehabilitation, propagation, research/field studies and advocacy efforts.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1310 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 22, 2019 10:25 am

Just outside Rapid City, SD, is an attraction called Thunderhead Falls. Over 130 years ago, miners first began excavating a tunnel at the site that would become Thunderhead, drilling the 600-foot long tunnel by hand as they followed a promising quartz vein, hoping for gold. While the gold was never found, they did discover the Thunderhead Underground Falls before the mine shut down around 1900. The Thunderhead was forgotten until 1949, when a railroad passenger, Vera Eklund, noticed water flowing out from the mountainside. After following the stream and discovering the Thunderhead, the Eklunds purchased the land and billed it as a tourist attraction.

While the origin of Thunderhead Underground Falls is not known for certain, many locals speculate that it was created when miners accidentally blasted a hole in the bed of Rapid Creek, which flows above the mine. The latest postings on the internet say that the site is now closed permanently. :(
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1311 Post by nrobertb » Tue Oct 22, 2019 6:17 pm

For anyone who likes the themes of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, and A Fistful of Dollars, google the performances by the Danish National Symphony Orchestra for a real treat.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1312 Post by nrobertb » Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:15 am

The Llano Estacado lies at the southern end of the Western High Plains ecoregion of the Great Plains of North America; it is part of what was once called the Great American Desert. The Canadian River forms the Llano's northern boundary, separating it from the rest of the High Plains. To the east, the Caprock Escarpment, a precipitous cliff about 300 feet high, lies between the Llano and the red Permian plains of Texas; while to the west, the Mescalero Escarpment demarcates the eastern edge of the Pecos River valley. The Llano has no natural southern boundary, instead blending into the Edwards Plateau near Big Spring, Texas. This geographic area stretches about 250 miles north to south, and 150 miles east to west, a total area of some 37,500 square miles, larger than Indiana and 12 other states. It covers all or part of 33 Texas counties and four New Mexico counties. Some years, a National Weather Service dust storm warning is issued in parts of Texas due to a dust storm originating from the area or from the adjacent lower part of the Southwestern Tablelands ecological region. The landscape is dotted by numerous small playa lakes, depressions that seasonally fill with water and provide habitat for waterfowl.

The Llano Estacado has a "cold semiarid" climate, characterized by long, hot summers and cold winters. Rainfall is relatively low; the entire region receives fewer than 23 in. of rainfall annually, and the western part receives as little as 14 in. High summer temperatures (average July temperature above 90 °F mean most of the small amount of precipitation is lost to evaporation, making dryland farming difficult.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1313 Post by nrobertb » Thu Oct 24, 2019 10:00 am

Great western character actors: Robert F. Simon (December 2, 1908 – November 29, 1992) was an American character actor.
Simon was born in 1908 in Mansfield in Richland County in north central Ohio, where he was an all-state high school basketball champion in the 1920s. He became an understudy to Lee J. Cobb for the lead in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman.

In 1955, he appeared on television in episodes of Medic and Alfred Hitchcock Presents as well as such feature films as Chief Crazy Horse, Seven Angry Men, and The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell. Actress Elizabeth Montgomery, who would later play Simon's daughter-in-law, Samantha, on Bewitched, made her film debut in The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell.

In 1956 and 1957, he appeared in episodes of State Trooper, The Millionaire and M Squad. In 1957, he appeared in the Betty Hutton film Spring Reunion, and as George Nordmann in the feature film Edge of the City, starring John Cassavetes and Sidney Poitier. In 1958, Simon guest-starred as Captain Woods in "The Coward of Fort Bennett" on General Electric Theater. In 1957 and 1958, he appeared in four episodes of the anthology series, Playhouse 90. In 1959, he appeared on Peter Gunn and Adventures in Paradise. His other 1950s film credits included appearances in The Buccaneer (1958), Compulsion (1959), The Last Angry Man (1959) and Operation Petticoat (1959).

There were few television westerns in which Simon did not guest star. From 1956 to 1970, he appeared in Broken Arrow, Disneyland, Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater, Laramie, Black Saddle, Law of the Plainsman, Johnny Ringo, Cheyenne, and The Dakotas, Wichita Town, The Man From Blackhawk, The Texan, Tombstone Territory, Tate, and Shotgun Slade, Stagecoach West, Bat Masterson, Lawman, Klondike, and Frontier Circus, Have Gun - Will Travel, Wagon Train, The Legend of Jesse James, The Road West, Gunsmoke, Laredo, The Virginian, Bonanza, and The Guns of Will Sonnett.

In 1962, Simon played the part of Mackie in the episode "House of the Hunter" on CBS's Rawhide. The same year he also portrayed Handy Strong in the feature film The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1314 Post by nrobertb » Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:13 am

This is an excerpt from a much longer essay on cowboy cussin' by Michael Branch.

I like to think of myself as a New West kind of guy, but all this regulation and penalizing of what I view as an essential mode of self-expression caused me to wonder what the tradition of profanity in the Old West might have been. It turns out that the pedigree of swearing in the West—and such swearing was once referred to with the beautiful phrase airin’ the lungs—is in fact quite distinguished. Profanity, slang, vernacular, and hyperbole were once woven deeply into the fabric of western life and manners. In fact, many of the flamboyant expressions pioneered by early cowboys, miners, and gamblers are still part of our American vocabulary. We all know what it means to be a bad egg, or to be bamboozled, or to have a bee in your bonnet. And even if we’ve forgotten the difference between chickenshit and horseshit, we remember what it means to be buffaloed, to be in cahoots, or to get something done by hook or by crook. After all, if you don’t cool your heels you might end up dead as a doornail. You may have a hard row to hoe (note to Millennials: row not road), but if you have a mind to pony up instead of being a skinflint and making tracks you might end up with enough coin to shake a stick at instead of winding up tuckered out and mad as a hornet. Gold miners taught us that although we all want to hit pay dirt, not everything we attempt in life will pan out. Cowboys reminded us to first hold our horses and then to strike while the iron is hot. Trail cooks suggested, none too politely, that we should quit our bellyaching. Sheepherders helped us see what it means to be on the fence or dyed in the wool; they also made stories into yarns, which they spun, sometimes in order to fleece the listener. As a writer and a certified curmudgeon, I especially appreciate that early printers expressed the feeling of being out of sorts—a term that refers to the grouchy mood brought on when a printer runs out of letters while setting type.

Of course it might be just as well that we’ve let a few of these old sayings fade into trail dust. It is perhaps wise that we no longer refer to facing a difficult undertaking as having big nuts to crack. All in all, though, we’ve lost more than we’ve gained. I wish we still referred to procrastination as beating the devil around the stump. I’d like to be able to say, when I’m in hurry, that I’m about to mizzle, burn the breeze, spudgel, light a shuck, marble, cut dirt, put my licks in, or, best of all, absquatulate. And why should I apologize for having forgotten something when I might instead say that I disremembered it—a term that is more honest, since my selective memory is actually a subversive form of passive resistance. For example, I seem routinely to disremember my children’s elementary school talent shows—where, if I were so unfortunate as to remember them, I would be subjected to an interminable lineup of kids breathlessly shrieking out Taylor Swift songs in voices that could worm a sheep.

As I began to lamp that if I didn’t mend my ways and hobble my latchpan I was going to be in for it, I fetched up on the idea of just blathering western all the time. (Translation: Observing that if I didn’t change for the better and be quiet I would get into trouble, I decided to speak in western slang constantly.) That way I could say exactly what I wanted to, do it forcefully and colorfully, and not have to arrange for direct deposit of my paycheck to the damned swear jar.
.

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1315 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 26, 2019 12:13 am

Whiskey Barrel Wood Mens Wedding Ring Twist Damascus Steel Wood Ring Lined with Whiskey Barrel White Oak .
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1316 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 26, 2019 9:16 pm

The Wind River Range (or "Winds" for short), is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in western Wyoming in the United States. The range runs roughly NW–SE for approximately 100 mi. The Continental Divide follows the crest of the range and includes Gannett Peak, which at 13,802 ft, is the highest peak in Wyoming. There are more than 40 other named peaks in excess of 12,999 ft. With the exception of the Grand Teton in the Teton Range, the next 19 highest peaks in Wyoming after Gannett are also in the Winds Two large National Forests including three wilderness areas encompass most of the mountain range. Shoshone National Forest is on the eastern side of the continental divide while Bridger-Teton National Forest is on the west. Both National Forests and the entire mountain range are an integral part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Portions of the range are also inside the Wind River Indian Reservation.

Indigenous peoples of the Great Basin, such as the Shoshones and Absarokas (Crow) Native Americans, lived in the range beginning 7000 and 9000 years ago. Villages as high as 10,000 ft in elevation, dating from 700 to 2000 BC, have recently been studied by archaeologists. These villages were established by the Sheepeater band of Shoshone during pine nut harvesting season. One, dubbed "High Rise", has 60 lodges over a space of 26 acres and was recently added to the National Register of Historic Places.

One of the men from the Lewis and Clark expedition, John Colter, is thought to be the first European American person to view the range when he visited the area around 1807, though little is known about his travels through the area. In 1812, a party led by Wilson Price Hunt were the first to cross South Pass, at the southern end of the range, the pass which marked the continental divide and crest of the Rocky Mountains and became an important portion of the Oregon Trail.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1317 Post by nrobertb » Sat Oct 26, 2019 9:57 pm

WWII U.S. Army bearpaw style snowshoes are an interesting collectible that has been showing up at antique shops and flea markets in the last couple of decades, after they were surplused from long time storage. They are made of wood with rawhide lashing and feature bindings with a metal toe plate that swivels on a rod. They have 1940's dates, serial numbers, and were produced by the Groswold Co. of Colorado and the Lund Co. of Minnesota, and possibly others. Most are in excellent condition, probably never used, and with care will still last an owner's lifetime. I've added homemade aluminum ice grippers to mine and they are good in any snow conditions.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1318 Post by nrobertb » Sun Oct 27, 2019 6:01 pm

The Bighorn River is a tributary of the Yellowstone, approximately 461 miles long, in the states of Wyoming and Montana in the western United States. The river was named in 1805 by fur trader François Larocque for the bighorn sheep he saw along its banks as he explored the Yellowstone.The upper reaches of the Bighorn, south of the Owl Creek Mountains in Wyoming, are known as the Wind River. The two rivers are sometimes referred to as the Wind/Bighorn. The Wind River officially becomes the Bighorn River at the Wedding of the Waters, on the north side of the Wind River Canyon near the town of Thermopolis. From there, the river flows through the Bighorn Basin in north central Wyoming, passing through Thermopolis and Hot Springs State Park.

At the border with Montana, the river turns northeast, and flows past the north end of the Bighorn Mountains, through the Crow Indian Reservation, where the Yellowtail Dam forms the Bighorn Lake reservoir. The reservoir and the surrounding canyon are part of the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area.
The Little Bighorn River joins the Bighorn near the town of Hardin, Montana. Approximately fifty miles farther downriver, the Bighorn River ends where it joins the Yellowstone.

The Bighorn River begins as the Wind River in the Rocky Mountains at Wind River Lake, near Two Ocean Mountain and the summit of Togwotee Pass. The Wind River flows southeast receiving the east fork of the Wind River from the north, and enters the Wind River Basin, flowing past Dubois and Johnstown, to Riverton, where it receives the Little Wind River. The river then changes direction to the northeast and then the north, flowing into Boysen Reservoir, which is formed by Boysen Dam. Below the dam it enters the Wind River Canyon, where the river narrows and forms many rapids. At the end of the canyon the Wind River widens out in an area called the Wedding of the Waters where it becomes the Bighorn River and enters the Bighorn Basin. The Bighorn continues northward, passing through Thermopolis, Worland, and Basin. At Greybull it receives the Greybull River, and about 30 mi north of that confluence it enters Bighorn Lake, where it is joined by the Shoshone River. North of the confluence with the Shoshone, the reservoir narrows as the river enters the Bighorn Canyon, where it crosses into Montana. At the end of the canyon, the river passes through Yellowtail Dam and Afterbay Dam. The river turns to the northeast and enters the Great Plains. At Hardin the river is joined by the Little Bighorn River. Approximately 50 mi downriver from the Little Bighorn, in Big Horn County, the Bighorn empties into the Yellowstone.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1319 Post by nrobertb » Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:57 pm

Some of the oldtimers liked to braid their lariats out of rawhide. Here's a photo of a 4-strand, 68' rope. These were very strong but had the drawback of stretching if they got wet.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#1320 Post by nrobertb » Mon Oct 28, 2019 11:24 am

I was watching a TV show about fantastic log houses. The host was visiting a house that was decorated with many stuffed animal heads. He remarked that it must have taken a long time to accumulate all of them. The homeowner replied, no, every time a hunter dies, the first thing the widow does is put all the heads out on the lawn and have a yard sale.
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