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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#826 Post by nrobertb » Sat Dec 01, 2018 5:17 pm

Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park is a state park in California, 12 miles south of Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park on California's Pacific coast. A main feature of the park is McWay Falls, which drops over a cliff of 80 feet into the Pacific Ocean. The park is also home to 300-foot redwoods which are over 2,500 years old
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#827 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:10 am

Great western character actors:

Elisha Cook Jr. In 1930, Cook traveled to California, where he made his film debut in Hollywood's version of the play Her Unborn Child, a motion picture directed by Albert Ray and produced by Windsor Picture Plays Inc. After several subsequent small roles and uncredited parts in other films, he began a long period playing weaklings or sadistic losers and hoodlums, who in the plots were usually murdered, either being strangled, poisoned or shot. Hollywood's most established fall guy for many years, he made a rare appearance in a cameo role in the 1941 slapstick comedy Hellzapoppin', performing as a screenwriter. In Universal's Phantom Lady (1944), he portrays a slimy, intoxicated nightclub-orchestra drummer to memorable effect. He also had a substantial, though uncredited role as Bobo in the 1953 film noir production I, the Jury.

In addition to his performance as Wilmer in The Maltese Falcon (1941), some of Cook's other notable roles include the doomed informant Harry Jones in The Big Sleep (1946), the henchman (Marty Waterman) of the murderous title character in Born to Kill (1947), the pugnacious ex-Confederate soldier 'Stonewall' Torrey who is gunned down by Jack Palance in Shane (1953), and George Peatty, the shady, cuckolded husband in Stanley Kubrick's The Killing (1956). Other films in which he appeared are William Castle's horror film House on Haunted Hill (1959), One-Eyed Jacks (1961), Papa's Delicate Condition (1963), Blood on the Arrow (1964), Rosemary's Baby (1968), The Great Bank Robbery (1969), El Condor (1970), The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid (1972), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), The Outfit (1973), Tom Horn (1980), and Treasure: In Search of the Golden Horse (1984).

Cook appeared on a wide variety of American television series from the early 1950s to the late 1980s. He played a private detective, Homer Garrity, in an episode of Adventures of Superman television series titled "Semi-Private Eye," airing for the first time on January 16, 1954. That same year, on April 12, he guest-starred on NBC's The Dennis Day Show. In 1960, he was cast in the episode "The Hermit" of the ABC sitcom The Real McCoys with Walter Brennan. He appeared too in 1960 as Jeremy Hake in the episode "The Bequest" of the ABC western series The Rebel, which starred Nick Adams. He also portrayed the character Gideon McCoy in the 1966 episode "The Night of the Bars of Hell" on The Wild Wild West. He performed as well in the second episode of ABC's crime drama The Fugitive.

Cook made two guest appearances on the CBS courtroom drama series Perry Mason. In 1958, he played Art Crowley in "The Case of the Pint-Sized Client", and in 1964 he played Reelin' Peter Rockwell in "The Case of the Reckless Rockhound". Cook portrayed lawyer Samuel T. Cogley in the Star Trek 1967 episode "Court Martial", Isaac Isaacson on the Batman television series, Weasel Craig in Salem's Lot, and later had a long-term recurring role as Honolulu crime lord "Ice Pick" on CBS's Magnum, P.I. He appeared too in The Bionic Woman episode "Once a Thief" in 1977.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#828 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 02, 2018 1:11 pm

A Garcia style spur from J.M. Capriola of Elko, Nevada.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#829 Post by nrobertb » Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:50 pm

Knives by A.G. Russell.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#830 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:56 am

A knife by Bob Dozier.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#831 Post by nrobertb » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:56 pm

Great western character actors:

Morgan Woodward. He is best known for his recurring role on the soap opera Dallas as Marvin "Punk" Anderson. He also played the silent, sunglasses-wearing "man with no eyes", Boss Godfrey (the Walking Boss) in Cool Hand Luke (1967), and has the most guest appearances on Gunsmoke and Wagon Train.

Woodward was born in Fort Worth, Texas, the third of five sons of Dr. Valin Woodward and his wife, Frances McKinley. He grew up in Arlington, Texas, graduating from high school in 1944. After serving in the US Army Air Corps during World War II, he enrolled at North Texas Agriculture College, where he was active in the theater. In 1948, he transferred to the University of Texas, from which he graduated with a degree in corporation finance. He went on to attend law school at UT. During that time he hosted a local radio talk show and sang with a barbershop quartet and a dance band.

Woodward was a member of the United States Army Air Corps during World War II. He returned to the military during the Korean War, this time as a lieutenant in special services.

One of Woodward's longest television roles was in forty-two episodes between 1958 and 1961 on the ABC television series The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp, as the deputy/sidekick "Shotgun" Gibbs. The series stars Hugh O'Brian. In that series, Woodward played a tall, cantankerous, shotgun-toting backwoodsman who eventually became the trusted deputy of lawman Wyatt Earp in his days as a Kansas and later Arizona lawman. Several episodes have comedy scenes about Gibbs and his beloved and supposedly highly intelligent mule, Roscoe. Though often overshadowed by the cool menace of Douglas Fowley's Doc Holliday, Woodward portrayed Gibbs as a solid, trustworthy, and more pragmatic partner to Earp, making Gibbs a character who, though ostensibly rough around the edges, would gradually come to share many of the qualities demonstrated over the years by another trusted television deputy, Ken Curtis' world-weary Festus Haggen on Gunsmoke, who like Shotgun Gibbs also rode a mule. He also played a professional fighter in "The Manly Art" (Season 3, episode 19) and a Texas Ranger Captain in the episode "Three" (Season 3, Episode 35).

Woodward also made multiple guest appearances on Wagon Train between 1958 and 1965.

In the horseback photo that is undoubtedly Vasquez Rocks in the background.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#832 Post by nrobertb » Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:46 am

Silver Falls State Park is a state park in the U.S. state of Oregon, located near Silverton, about 20 miles east-southeast of Salem. It is the largest state park in Oregon with an area of more than 9,000 acres, and it includes more than 24 miles of walking trails, 14 miles of horse trails, and a 4-mile bike path. The photos show the upper and lower falls.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#833 Post by nrobertb » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:34 pm

This is an Armstrong Marvel machinist's or blacksmith's tool called a rod parter, for cutting round stock, The machines come in different sizes. This No 4 will handle 5 sizes of rod, through 3/8". The set screw on top holds a rod to indicate the length you want to cut, very handy if cutting several pieces of the same length.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#834 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 05, 2018 10:09 am

A pair of spurs by Oscar Crockett 1884-1949
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#835 Post by nrobertb » Wed Dec 05, 2018 6:32 pm

Here's a knife from K.R. Traders.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#836 Post by nrobertb » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:27 am

Great western character actors:

Whit Bissell came to Hollywood in the 1940s, and by the time he retired he had appeared in more than 200 movies and scores of TV series. He is best known for playing the evil scientist who turned Michael Landon into a half beast in the 1957 cult classic film I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957). Bissell specialized in playing doctors, military officers and other authority figures. On television he was a regular on Bachelor Father (1957) and The Time Tunnel (1966). He also served on the Screen Actors Guild board of directors for 18 years and represented the actors branch in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences board of governors.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#837 Post by nrobertb » Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:00 pm

A knife from Gas Point Forge,
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#838 Post by nrobertb » Fri Dec 07, 2018 11:05 am

Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve is a protected area in the northern Siskiyou Mountains of southwestern Oregon in the United States. The 4,554-acre (1,843 ha) park, including the marble cave, is 20 miles\ east of Cave Junction, on Oregon Route 46. The protected area, managed by the National Park Service, is in southwestern Josephine County, near the Oregon–California border.

Elijah Davidson, a resident of nearby Williams, discovered the cave in 1874. Over the next two decades, private investors failed in efforts to run successful tourist ventures at the publicly owned site. After passage of the Antiquities Act by the United States Congress, in 1909 President William Howard Taft established Oregon Caves National Monument, to be managed by the United States Forest Service. The growing popularity of the automobile, construction of paved highways, and promotion of tourism by boosters from Grants Pass led to large increases in cave visitation during the late 1920s and thereafter. Among the attractions at the remote monument is the Oregon Caves Chateau, a six-story hotel built in a rustic style in 1934. It is a National Historic Landmark and is part of the Oregon Caves Historic District within the monument. The NPS, which assumed control of the monument in 1933, offers tours of the cave from mid-April through early November. In 2014, the protected area was expanded by about 4,000 acres and re-designated a National Monument and Preserve.

Oregon Caves is a solutional cave, with passages totaling about 15,000 feet, formed in marble. The parent rock was originally limestone that metamorphosed to marble during the geologic processes that created the Klamath Mountains, including the Siskiyous. Although the limestone formed about 190 million years ago, the cave itself is no older than a few million years. Valued as a tourist cave, the cavern also has scientific value; sections of the cave that are not on tour routes contain fossils of national importance.

Activities at the park include cave touring, hiking, photography, and wildlife viewing. One of the park trails leads through the forest to Big Tree, which at 13 feet is the widest Douglas fir known in Oregon. Lodging and food are available at The Chateau and in Cave Junction. Camping is available in the preserve at the Cave Creek Campground, at a local USFS campground, and private sites in the area.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#839 Post by nrobertb » Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:56 pm

Bear Butte is a geological laccolith feature located near Sturgis, South Dakota, United States, that was established as a State Park in 1961. An important landmark and religious site for the Plains Indians tribes long before Europeans reached South Dakota, Bear Butte is called Bear Mountain, by the Lakota, or Sioux. To the Cheyenne, it is known as "giving hill" or "bear hill", and is the place where God imparted to Sweet Medicine, a Cheyenne prophet, the knowledge from which the Cheyenne derive their religious, political, social, and economic customs.

The mountain is sacred to many indigenous peoples, who make pilgrimages to leave prayer cloths and tobacco bundles tied to the branches of the trees along the mountain's flanks. Other offerings are often left at the top of the mountain. The site is associated with various religious ceremonies throughout the year. The mountain is a place of prayer, meditation, and peace.

The park includes a campsite west of South Dakota Highway 79 where horseback riding, fishing, and boating are permitted. On the summit side of Highway 79, a moderately sized herd of buffalo roams the base of the mountain. An education center and a summit trail are available. Official park policy advises visitors to Bear Butte to respect worshipers and to leave religious offerings undisturbed. Park fees are waived for those undertaking religious activities.

In 2007, Gov. Mike Rounds of South Dakota announced a proposal to use state, federal and private money to buy a perpetual easement in order to prevent commercial and residential development of some land on the western side of Bear Butte. This would cost more than $1 million, but would prevent development of nuisance businesses (such as potentially lucrative biker bars) on ranch land near the mountain on the northern edge of the Black Hills.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#840 Post by nrobertb » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:34 am

Great western character actors:

Kam Tong was a Chinese-American actor from San Francisco about whom not much is known, other than his role as Hey Boy on Have Gun and his many appearances, typically uncredited, playing various minor oriental characters in many movies and television shows, beginning with The General Died at Dawn in 1936 up until an appearance on The Big Valley in 1969, the year of his death at age 62. He appeared in his role as Hey Boy in 109 episodes of Have Gun.
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