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Spurs and the Great West

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nrobertb
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#901 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jan 06, 2019 5:49 pm

The McInnis Canyons National Conservation Area is a 123,400-acre National Conservation Area located in Mesa County, west of Grand Junction, Colorado. The MCNCA has rugged sandstone canyons, natural arches, spires, and alcoves carved into the Colorado Plateau, through which runs a 24-mile stretch of the Colorado River. Included is the 75,500-acre Black Ridge Canyons Wilderness with 5,200 acres extending into eastern Grand County, Utah at the MCNCA's western boundary.

McInnis Canyons NCA has a variety of resources and recreation opportunities resulting in users with diverse interests, including hiking, biking, float boating, off-highway vehicle use, horseback riding, hunting, wildlife watching, backpacking, camping, and grazing resources; as well as geological, paleontological and scientific sites.

McInnis Canyons is also home to the Rattlesnake Arches. This area houses the highest concentration of naturally occurring arches in Colorado, and even the second most in the world, behind Arches National Park. It is located in the Black Ridge Canyons Wilderness and comprises sandstone formations, and is not able to be reached by vehicle.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#902 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:39 pm

Well, if you don't have a horse, you can always use your saddle as a bar stool.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#903 Post by nrobertb » Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:39 pm

A couple of antique knives with antler handle.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#904 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jan 08, 2019 12:03 am

Another weaver with her rug at a store in Cortez, Colorado. This one retailed for $660.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#905 Post by nrobertb » Tue Jan 08, 2019 5:36 pm

If you aren't afraid of heights, try the skywalk at Grand Canyon West.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#906 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:00 am

Chute dogging is a rodeo event related to steer wrestling, in which the steer used weighs between 400 and 500 pounds. However, the competitor starts the event in a roping chute with the steer as opposed to grabbing onto the steer from horseback. The event is designed to give novices a chance to prepare for steer wrestling.

When the chute opens, the competitor must bring the steer to a line ten feet from the chute and wrestle (or "dog") the steer to the ground. In order to count as a legal fall, all four feet of the steer must be in the air when the steer is on the ground. Other falls are called "dog falls," and the competitor must try to let the steer get up and try to get all four legs in the air. The competitor can be disqualified for losing contact with the steer or tripping the steer.

It is a timed event, with the time starting at the moment the chute dogger crosses the ten foot line. The steer must be wrestled within 60 seconds.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#907 Post by nrobertb » Wed Jan 09, 2019 6:10 pm

Here's a knife with ox bone and burl wood handle.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#908 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:28 am

A gal leg spur.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#909 Post by nrobertb » Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:21 pm

Steer riding is a rodeo youth event that is an introductory form of bull riding for younger riders, usually between the ages of seven and fourteen. Instead of bucking bulls, the children ride steers that buck. Steers are used because they are known to have a less volatile temperament than bulls and many breeds weigh less than bulls, which makes them a perfect stepping stone to junior bulls. The steers usually weigh between 500 to 1,000 pounds. Steer riding usually follows mutton busting and calf riding as the participant ages and grows. Many young and aspiring bull riders who train in steer riding compete in the National Junior Bullriders Association.t and riding techniques that are similar to adult bull riding. The riders wear batwing chaps and spurs. For safety, they use protective vests and helmets with a face mask that resemble those worn by hockey goalies.

Like bull riding, riders must stay on for eight seconds for a qualified ride. Half of the score is awarded for the cowboy’s ability to ride, and the other half for the steer’s ability to buck. One difference is that in some steer riding competitions, riders are allowed to hang on with both hands. They can choose to compete riding one-handed, like the adults, but if they do, they fall under the same rules as bull riding and can be disqualified for grabbing the steer with both hands. Riders can also be disqualified for touching the animal or themselves during the ride. Failure to stay on for the full 8 seconds or a disqualification results in a no score.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#910 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jan 11, 2019 12:37 pm

Palo Duro Canyon is a canyon system of the Caprock Escarpment located in the Texas Panhandle near the cities of Amarillo and Canyon. As the second-largest canyon in the United States, it is roughly 120 mi long and has an average width of 6 mi, but reaches a width of 20 mi at places. Its depth is around 820 ft, but in some locations, it increases to 1,000 ft. Palo Duro Canyon (from the Spanish meaning "hard wood" or, more exactly, "hard stick") has been named "The Grand Canyon of Texas" both for its size and for its dramatic geological features, including the multicolored layers of rock and steep mesa walls similar to those in the Grand Canyon.

The canyon was formed by the Prairie Dog Town Fork Red River, which initially winds along the level surface of the Llano Estacado of West Texas, then suddenly and dramatically runs off the Caprock Escarpment. Water erosion over the millennia has shaped the canyon's geological formations. Notable canyon formations include caves and hoodoos. One of the best-known and the major signature feature of the canyon is the Lighthouse Rock. A multiple-use, six-mile round-trip loop trail is dedicated to the formation.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#911 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:35 pm

This is the portable forge I showed earlier, now cleaned up. The white material in the pan is refactory clay, which keeps the cast iron pan from cracking. Most farmers didn't bother with the clay, so you often see these with cracks. This one had a crack four inches long starting at the rim., which I was able to get welded.

There was just a quarter inch hole for adding grease to the four gears that drive the fan, so to facilitate the process I threaded the hole and added a zerk fitting.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#912 Post by nrobertb » Fri Jan 11, 2019 6:15 pm

The Oregon Coast Trail is a long-distance hiking route along the Pacific coast of Oregon in the United States. It follows the coast of Oregon from the mouth of the Columbia River to the California border south of Brookings.

The walking length of the trail varies depending on choice of passage across or around estuaries and rivers along the route. If a ferry is not arranged or available, an alternate route around the estuary must be taken; if traveling on foot, this means road walking. The length of the trail, using the Google Maps pedometer tool to measure route mileage, is about 425 miles if no ferries are used, though the official coastal guide gives a length of 382 miles. If no ferries are used, about 39 percent of the route is on the beach, 41 percent is on paved road, and 20 percent is on trail and dirt roads.

A chief feature of the trail are the public beaches created in 1967 via the Oregon Beach Bill, which formalized the public nature of the coastal beaches since the first such law was passed in 1913. Many of the locations, particularly on the southern portion, are remote and isolated. The Oregon coast is bordered by a temperate rainforest, much of which is now second or third growth.

The difficulty of the trail ranges from easy to moderate, with elevation changes of up to a few hundred feet. The northern trailhead is at the base of the south jetty of the Columbia River, approximately 4 miles north of the campground of Fort Stevens State Park and about 13 miles from the city of Astoria. The trail runs north-south along the entire Oregon Coast, following the shore as closely as practical. For many portions of the route, it is beach walking, mostly on sand. In populated areas it often follows the nearest street to the shore. Many parts of the trail leave the beach and take an inland path, usually where land formations make the shoreline impassable, such as at Cape Kiwanda. Some of the rocky headlands are passable on foot at beach level only at low tide. Other headlands are traversed by state park or forest service trails well above the sea. In many other places, the road is the only feasible route, mostly U.S. Route 101. The southern terminus of the trail is the unmarked Oregon/California border on a stretch of beach about 5 miles south of Brookings, and about half a mile south of the Winchuck River.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#913 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jan 12, 2019 11:22 am

Roaring Springs, an arduous yet beautiful 4.7 mile hike down the North Kaibab trail, is one of the North Rim's awe-inspiring attractions. It is also a vital source of water, providing drinking water for every visitor and resident within Grand Canyon National Park. The park's new water bottle filling stations provide free, Grand Canyon spring water from Roaring Springs.

The pump house is the vehicle for the precious water that shoots out of the Bright Angel Shale and supplies the canyon with its pristine and pure water source. The water is delivered to the South Rim via a pipeline buried beneath the North Kaibab Trail (installed 1965-1970). You can see this amazing pipeline as it stretches across the Colorado River on the underside of the Bright Angel Trail's Silver Bridge.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#914 Post by nrobertb » Sat Jan 12, 2019 3:59 pm

Safes play a big part in westerns. They are always getting robbed or blown up. Probably the best safe scene is in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. As dollar bills rain down frown the blown railroad car safe, somebody says "I told you you were using too much dynamite."

Here is a 1904 Victor, made in Cincinnati.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

#915 Post by nrobertb » Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:39 am

Whipcracking is the act of producing a cracking sound through the use of a whip. Used during livestock driving and horse riding,

The crack a whip makes is produced when a section of the whip moves faster than the speed of sound creating a small sonic boom. The creation of the sonic boom was confirmed in 1958 by analyzing the high-speed shadow photography taken in 1927.

Recently, an additional, purely geometrical factor was recognized: the tip of the whip moves twice as fast at the loop of the whip, just like the top of a car's wheel moves twice as fast as the car itself.

In 1997, Discover Magazine reported about the possibility of the "whipcracking" effect millions of years ago. As part of the joint computer scientists' and paleontologists' research into the motion of dinosaurs, Nathan Myhrvold, a chief technology officer from Microsoft, carried out a computer simulation of an apatosaurus, which has a very long, tapering tail resembling a whip. Basing on the reasoning described above, Myhrvold concluded that sauropods were capable of producing a crack comparable to the sound of a cannon.

Alfred "Lash" LaRue was a popular western motion picture star of the 1940s and 1950s. He had exceptional skill with the bullwhip and taught Harrison Ford how to use a bullwhip for the Indiana Jones movies. LaRue was one of the first recipients of the Golden Boot Awards in 1983.
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